What We Learned From Japan Earthquake

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anandvy
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Re: What We Learned From Japan Earthquake
anandvy   5/11/2012 3:40:28 AM
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For example, relying on a single source or route for materials and parts might be more cost effective, but in this scenario, operations can quickly break down if the supply chain is disrupted.

@Carla, why do you think the companies are so hesitant to build backup so that supply chain is not disrupted during down time ? Is it because the companies don't have extra money to take such saftey measures or is it because companies dont expect prolonged supply chain disruption which will impact their revenue flow ?




anandvy
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anandvy   5/11/2012 3:26:17 AM
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So what measures the electronic supply chain can take to take care of such disruptions? In my opinion nothing !.

@Prabhakar, I think it would be too extreme to say that "we can't do anything about such supply chain distruptions". I think companies can do a lot of things which can help them during supply chain breakdown. For example everyone knows that Japan is prone to earthquake, one of the the things they can do is to move part of their businesses outside japan so that they can significantly reduce the risk.

anandvy
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Re : What We Learned From Japan Earthquake
anandvy   5/11/2012 3:21:15 AM
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UPS asked high-tech manufacturers based in the Asia-Pacific region about the supply chain aftershocks they experienced as part of its annual high-tech industry survey

@Carla, just wondering why this survey was specific to Asia-pacific ? Is it because Asia-pacific is more prone to supply chain disruption ?  Do we have any similar compiled data for other regions too?

syedzunair
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syedzunair   5/8/2012 3:03:10 PM
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Rightly said, certain things are beyond our control. We cannot natural disasters but what we can control is minimizing the downtime and ensuring protocols that will enable a speedy data recovery so that the transactional details are not lost. 

Jacob
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Jacob   5/8/2012 2:08:23 AM
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"So what measures the electronic supply chain can take to take care of such disruptions? In my opinion nothing!"

Prabhakar, "as much as possible" that's the answer. Certain things are beyond our control, where the super natural forces have to act. The same thing happened for Titanic, they build and claimed that it's one of the most advanced and secure luxury ship and we know finally what happens to it.

pocharle
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Re: Carla's Note on the Japanese Earthquake
pocharle   5/6/2012 4:21:46 PM
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"Running a too-lean operation..."

What does a too-lean operation look like OR what is it?

I thought running lean was a good thing that helps the maximize profitability. Isn't that good for the economy?

prabhakar_deosthali
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prabhakar_deosthali   5/5/2012 1:59:34 AM
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While I was working in the Atomic Energy domain, we came across a term "maximum credible accident"  , a factor to be considered while designing the cooling system of the nuclear reactors . 

In my opinion the disaster such as the Japan earth quake falls under that "maximum credible accident" category  and we have seen that even the nuclear reactor at Fukushima , designed to wthstand such accidents , could not survive the onsalught of the resultant Tsunami.

So what measures the electronic supply chain can take to take care of such disruptions?  In my opinion  nothing !.

We have to just forget such natural incidents as one-off unavoidable events in our life.

It will be too expensive for small and medium companies to plan for alternative strategies for disasters of such a magnitude.

 

_hm
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Expensive approach
_hm   5/4/2012 9:55:11 PM
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It depends on type of industry you are working in and who pays for this exepnsive approach. For most industtry, they soon forget the this disrruption and cary on with day to day business.

 

FLYINGSCOT
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crystal ball
FLYINGSCOT   5/4/2012 8:31:02 AM
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I would like to hear more about "visibility technology" as it is not a term I am familiar with.  Sounds like alchemy perhaps.

Jacob
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Stocks and production
Jacob   5/4/2012 5:12:50 AM
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"It's critical that companies plan ahead to manage risks, especially in highly competitive industries such as high-tech, in which companies cannot afford disruptions in operations"

Carla, I agree with this point. But in economic slowdown and recession scenario, most of the companies won't try to invest more on the inventories. For them such investments are like dead investments, without an immediate return. I know most of our clients are following the same line and normally they stocks materials only for another one or two months production.

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