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Managing Talent in the Age of the Dragon

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TaimoorZ
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Re: Training vs Talent
TaimoorZ   11/30/2012 11:25:24 AM
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@Mr Roques: I agree. An ideal job has to be a mix of intellectual component and physical skills. While the weight of each of these components may vary from job to job, you should at least have both these components present in the job description. For instance, even a simple factory worker should have some tasks that require him to use his intellectual skills besides the physical skills.

TaimoorZ
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Re: It Will Be
TaimoorZ   11/30/2012 11:19:15 AM
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@Rich: These events that you mentioned are exception events which are not part of the regular course of the economy. In these cases the market forces may not be able to bring an equilibrium in the job market and some external intervention may be required.

Douglas Alexander
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Re: Training vs Talent
Douglas Alexander   11/29/2012 9:38:56 PM
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@Nemos...I agree. Head knowledge vs. hands on training. The hands on training can help produce a product so the business can recoup some of the cost of the new employee. With head knowledge available via multiple sources including self guided training, the final evaluation of the candidates chances will be determined by the interviewing team that may use a qualifying or screening written test as well. When I was looking to hire a Component Engineer, I had prepared a written test with various answer formats including A B C or D and some circuit drawing challenges. If a prospect could not pass the basic test, I did not interview. If they did, the first question I might ask is how much hands on experience do you have? The resume can be pretty doctored including false claims to advanced degrees so the interview remains the best tell of all. Not withstanding, if the person showed a strong potential but had little experience, I still might hire them because most of what a CE knows, he has to learn on the job. Every company does things differently and it may be that difference that gives them their competitive edge. The last thing you want to do is hire a "know it all."

Mr. Roques
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Re: Training vs Talent
Mr. Roques   11/29/2012 5:44:05 PM
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By creating jobs that don't require the use of intellectual, but mainly manual labor, even though specialized, they make people less happy and more probable to jump to another company that offers a slightly better salary.

They are forcing their way into robots. 

Bolaji Ojo
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Re: "private and public training institutes"
Bolaji Ojo   11/28/2012 8:56:56 AM
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Sparky, Thank you. You said what many need to say but instead avoid. Recently, I visited a company in Germany started by a family patriach who has since retired. The son who succeeded him is now in his 60s and will possibly retire in a few years. The business is doing fine but there's nobody in the family following in his footsteps. His children all have MBAs and are working in the banking industry. He considers them less productive than many of his technicians and engineers but they also remind him they make a lot more money than his workers -- when they finally got hired, that is.

Sparky the Wonder Cat
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Re: "private and public training institutes"
Sparky the Wonder Cat   11/28/2012 8:45:44 AM
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"Among the qualifications to run this equipment: trigonometry. Manufacturers aren't looking for EEs; they're looking for mechanical engineers. The labor pool is chock full of over-qualified workers or entry level employees who need to be trained. ..." I'm not aware of the "over-qualified workers" circumstance, unless it's the IT or Business offices. At the Manufacturing level I see a shortage of Technicians: You don't need Mechanical Engineers to run assembly apparatus. I've two daughters who graduated from UGA, with MBAs. They spent almost as many years looking for work as they did earning their degrees. My son, however, recently graduated from HS at age 16, entered a 2-year trade school (Athens Technical College) for an Associate Degree in CNC programming and had 3 offers by the end of his first year. These were living wage positions with benefits, two in the private sector and one with the Army Corps of Engineers. So, to the point of "...private and public training institutes..." I suggest Public High Schools reinvent themselves by offering Trades as part of the curriculum, and introducing HS students to Junior/Community/Tech schools as part of the weekly schedule, to develop real-world job skills for today's market. Maybe -- just maybe -- if they see the reward of employment at the end of High School, they'll begin to work harder, grade higher, and manufacturing businesses both large and small will have a better labor pool from which to draw talent. []

Nemos
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Re: Training vs Talent
Nemos   11/28/2012 5:38:05 AM
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Some of those programs are really very good and in some cases much better than the courses or the programs  that you have to pay.( for example www.coursera.org) But when I am saying that the companies should invest to training I mean that they should build their own educational structure (like coursera ).

Hospice_Houngbo
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Re:
Hospice_Houngbo   11/27/2012 7:43:57 PM
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@prabhakar_deosthali

"What we need is to have the private and public training institutes to orient their courses or design new courses to match the newly created job opportunities"

This debate about the lack of concordance between what is taught in schools and the skills needed in the enterprise is nothing new. I think the education sector is different from the industry  and we cannot expect that to change overnight.

Hospice_Houngbo
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Re: Training vs Talent
Hospice_Houngbo   11/27/2012 7:33:04 PM
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@Nemos,

"there are plenty of educational tools without cost"

There are free alternatives to spending thousands of dollars to gain the required skills. But do you think that certificates obtained from open course universities are valued by companies?

Hospice_Houngbo
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Supply Network Guru
Re: It Will Be
Hospice_Houngbo   11/27/2012 7:26:01 PM
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@Rich,

Which one do you think will likely happen? Is the best yet to come or the golden yeears of prosperity are way behind us?

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