Finding the Right Production Shore Is Tricky

NO RATINGS
View comments: newest first | oldest first | threaded
pocharle
User Rank
Supply Network Guru
Re: Finding the Right Production Shore Is Tricky
pocharle   11/29/2010 2:03:51 PM
NO RATINGS

I hear that over there when it comes to products, they only provide citizens with Chinese-made supplies. For example, McDonald's in China are only allowed to use Chinese-made food 'products'. Interesting shift.

Craig Gottlieb
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Finding the Right Production Shore Is Tricky
Craig Gottlieb   11/29/2010 1:54:29 PM
NO RATINGS

My personal take is that to date, companies have largely focused on the sales side of the equation when it comes to being locally relevant.  Marketing and product differentiation have become increasingly attuned to local tastes and needs.  Part of what I was getting at in my post was that we are now seeing the same sort of attention to location and differentiation being made on the manufacturing side.  One could argue that the growing success of offshore production and the commensurate rise of those economies (and the cost to operate there) is another factor that has made a broader based conversation on manufacturing location more possible.

Ms. Daisy
User Rank
Supply Network Guru
Re: Finding the Right Production Shore Is Tricky
Ms. Daisy   11/29/2010 9:05:27 AM
NO RATINGS

It has definitely has come back to haunt the US market in general. China is already refusing to accept US exports and has been able to do this with impunity because of China's new found economic advantage.

Backorder
User Rank
Supply Network Guru
Re: Finding the Right Production Shore Is Tricky
Backorder   11/29/2010 8:45:41 AM
NO RATINGS

Striking the right balance is the key. For perspective's sake, we can look at the China-US currnecy imbroglio, and the deeper roots behind it. The fact that a lot of manufacturing has made China its base gives it an advantage in global economics that might come back to haunt the parent nations of such companies. Oh wait, is there any such thing as a parent nation for an MNC?

Ms. Daisy
User Rank
Supply Network Guru
Re: Finding the Right Production Shore Is Tricky
Ms. Daisy   11/27/2010 12:32:45 PM
NO RATINGS

No doubt globalization is the future of commerce in general. But like you I do not want my food coming from a world away were the agricultural practices are not monitored and the produce are proped up with chemicals to keep them "market fresh". In terms of technolgies and other none agricultural products, I am open to the off shore production. I agree a balance has to be struck to ensure fair trade and reduced cost of production.

Backorder
User Rank
Supply Network Guru
Re: Finding the Right Production Shore Is Tricky
Backorder   11/27/2010 9:23:58 AM
NO RATINGS

Going "Glocal" also means adapting the products and selling to suit the customer base. Not only the manufactring but the Sales operations have to be suited both for the local market as well as the global vendor.

Toms
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Finding the Right Production Shore Is Tricky
Toms   11/25/2010 1:03:23 AM
NO RATINGS
1 saves

     Craigh, I like the word glocal, which can sense a lot about the local product which goes to global. As a part of globalization all most all the countries had opened their internal markets for foreign investment with red carpets & soap facilities. In some way, it’s not at all favoring the small and medium scale industries. The normal way of globalization is migration of manpower to other nations, where Labour cost is less. I think instead of only migrating the man power the companies have to focus on the availability of resources. I mean they have to build up the production line, where resources are cheaply available and then the tech power comes automatically. So they can explore both the resources and Labour power in economic way and can sell the product globally.



Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EBN Dialogue / LIVE CHAT
EBN Dialogue enables you to participate in live chats with notable leaders and luminaries. Open to the entire EBN community of electronics supply chain experts, these conversations see ideas shared, comments made, and questions asked and answered in real time. Listed below are upcoming and archived chats. Stay tuned and join in!
Upcoming Dialogues
REMIND ME
Live Chat 9/25: Minimizing Risk in the Global Supply Chain
Dave Bowen, CEO of e-sourcing firm MarketMaker4, will be our guest as we explore ways to minimize and manage geo-political and corporate risk in supply chain and sourcing through the use of technology.
9/25/2014
Remind Me
Archived Dialogues
Live Chat 8/20: Supply Chain Trends to Watch for the Rest of 2014
The supply chain hasn't quite reached the complexity of global phenomena like weather. So we've asked Jim O'Reilly to predict trends while answering your questions.
Live Chat 7/24: Effective Channel Management
Joe Alphonse and Tom Howell of Revitas discuss how to implement an effective channel management strategy.
Latest Poll
EBN Newswire
Twitter Feed
EBN Online Twitter Feed