|

Creating Effective Tech PR Strategies

NO RATINGS
View comments: newest first | oldest first | threaded
Page 1 of 2   Next >   Last >>
Ford Kanzler
User Rank
Blogger
Re: OD-ing on Press Releases
Ford Kanzler   2/14/2012 6:22:59 PM
NO RATINGS

Well, we used to refer to editorial people has "hacks." So what's in a name? :) NOTE: There are lots more "PR gals" in tech than "guys." Been that way for over 20 years. Not sure why. But that's really off topic for this blog.

Tvotapka
User Rank
Stock Keeper
Re: OD-ing on Press Releases
Tvotapka   2/14/2012 5:25:09 PM
NO RATINGS

Great subject heading" OD-ing on Press Releases! And I totally duplicate what you're saying about volume over quality. Like Barbara, I've been on the receiving end of the press release pipeline. What was it we used to call PR guys? Oh yes, flaks. It wasn't a very nice term, but it did fit in some instances!

Ford Kanzler
User Rank
Blogger
OD-ing on Press Releases
Ford Kanzler   2/14/2012 5:01:06 PM
NO RATINGS

Tvotapka - Definitely not cool or at all smart. If its news, it better be at least NEW and preferably newsWORTHY. I've not encountered anyone who has recycled previously-issued announcements. Today's world is frankly too connected to get away with that dumb stunt. More importantly, relyng on news releases as your only or main publicity tool is like the carpenter only using a hammer. "PR doesn't stand for Press Release." That' one of the chapters in my just-published book, "Connecting the Mind and Voice of Business" - http://www.amazon.com/Connecting-Mind-Voice-Business-ebook/dp/B005R521N2  There's a huge range of PR tactics that may be applied without getting stuck for news release topics. I've had clients and a boss once who insisted on a news release every week. Unless you're a giant in your industry (IBM, Intel, Cisco, ect.) and there's lots happening, there's no reason for over-doing the tactic. I mean how many people want to read about non-newsworthy stuff the equivalent of "my cat had kittens?" Doing that also sucks up a company's valuable PR and marketing resources that could be far better applied to more valuable tactics.

 

Tvotapka
User Rank
Stock Keeper
Re: Tech PR problems
Tvotapka   2/14/2012 1:41:54 PM
NO RATINGS

Ford's summation on tech PR is right on target. The purpose of PR is to make one's good work well known. This doesn't get accomplished by "banging out a news release."  The only other thing I could add to the comments is another big no-no I've seen; that is the dreaded "repurposed" news release. Some agencies get clever with this and try to bank on the fact that most product section editors don't keep track of each new product announcement they've run. Not cool.

Ford Kanzler
User Rank
Blogger
Media Engagement...How Much?
Ford Kanzler   2/13/2012 3:26:34 PM
NO RATINGS

Bolaji - To your question, ignoring what's being said about your brand is certainly dangerous. However, choosing to not respond in various instances, or remaining notably less responsive than other competing brands to media inquires or only responding when and how you desire is a strategic business choice. Suggest well-excuted PR in general and media relations in particular, doesn't demand responsiveness to every media inquiry in every instance. Could it hurt a brand because it formerly snubbed certain media people? Perhaps. People change. People forget. Public relations is a highly situationally-based practice, like the law. I reject a hard, fast rule around this topic. Being highly selective may have the appearance to some people of the company being non-responsive. 

Bolaji Ojo
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What if . . .
Bolaji Ojo   2/13/2012 2:50:00 PM
NO RATINGS

Ford, Thank you for the additional comments. I would still like your opinion on the second part of my question because I think it lies at the heart of public relations whatever the status of the company. To reiterate, is there a danger even for a rock star company in ignoring certain parts of its PR machinery? In other words, if a company has so much goodwill it doesn't bother to respond to press inquiries, is it losing anything and more specifically, could it find itself in jeopardy later on?

Ford Kanzler
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What if . . .
Ford Kanzler   2/13/2012 2:04:26 PM
NO RATINGS

Hi Bolaji - The example you're referring to doesn't mean that such a company doesn't do PR. They're just consciously remaining passive in certain parts of their media relations, as in editorial outreach or responding to editorial inquires. They're doing PR nevertheless, just not the way most brands need to typically do media relations and publcity. Brands like this, which have achieved rock star status in their category, garner media coverage without asking. Quite often the media people themselves are among those holding the brand's goodwill. Cultivating their interest isn't necessary.

For brands NOT as winningly blessed with customer adoration as this supposedly fictitious brand, who believe they don't need PR of any sort, I'd strongly suggest they're giving their story up to their competitors or at best, random chance that something good may occsionally occur. Additionally, if they're already successful NOT doing PR, they could most certainly become more successful if they stopped ignorring the most cost-effective strategic communications tool in the business arsenal.

Ford Kanzler
User Rank
Blogger
Have a strategy & share it
Ford Kanzler   2/13/2012 1:38:01 PM
NO RATINGS

Scot - Yes. That was one of the key points of my earlier posts. Make sure your brand has a strategy...something that is clearly actionable and cometitively differentiated. Then make sure its not a secret. 

FLYINGSCOT
User Rank
Supply Network Guru
Front line
FLYINGSCOT   2/13/2012 12:40:01 PM
NO RATINGS

PR needs to be an integral part of the overall strategy to ensure the strategy can be implemented as smoothly as possible.  Everyone from customers to project team members need to understand the main thrust of the stretegy.

Bolaji Ojo
User Rank
Blogger
What if . . .
Bolaji Ojo   2/13/2012 11:03:17 AM
NO RATINGS

Ford, What if a company just doesn't believe it has to engage in PR? I don't want to mention a particular company by name here but what happens when a company has so much goodwill following its commercial success that the press writes frequently about it, the customers swear by it and it has a fanatical follower base?

Such a company exists today and aside from its own special events, this company does not communicate directly to the public or try to cultivate journalists. Is that a mistake or are there exceptions to the rule?

Page 1 of 2   Next >   Last >>


More Blogs from Savvy Tech Marketing
Mapping out a smart marketing strategy is critical for organizations trying to successfully negotiate the twists and turns of corporate branding, public relations and other activities.
To succeed, a brand needs to demonstrate customer value, not merely claim it.
Without management support, public relations effors are nothing but hot air.
It's reasonable to want to measure the effectiveness of the marketing communications efforts at your high tech company. However, actually doing it may be easier said than done.
Confusion abounds in high-tech organization about what public relations really is. Let's shed some light on that topic by exploring what PR isn't.
Twitter Feed
EBN Online Twitter Feed
EBN Dialogue / LIVE CHAT
EBN Dialogue enables you to participate in live chats with notable leaders and luminaries. Open to the entire EBN community of electronics supply chain experts, these conversations see ideas shared, comments made, and questions asked and answered in real time. Listed below are upcoming and archived chats. Stay tuned and join in!
Archived Dialogues
Live Chat 01/15: CPOs Re-Shape Their Business Roles
Increasingly chief procurement officers (CPOs) are re-shaping their organizational role to focus on creating results far beyond cost controls. A new IBM survey explores how.
Live Chat 11/12: Examining the Cyberthreat to Supply Chains
The number of cyberattacks is on the rise and hackers are targeting the supply chain. Drew Smith, founder and CEO of InfoArmor, will be on hand to discuss the reality of today's threat landscape and what to do about it.