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Australia Leads in 3D Titanium Printing

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Susan Fourtané
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Re: Looks good for prototypes
Susan Fourtané   4/22/2016 3:18:01 PM
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Thank you! -Susan

Aadil
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Re: Looks good for prototypes
Aadil   4/22/2016 3:16:18 PM
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good post.

Susan Fourtané
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Re: Looks good for prototypes
Susan Fourtané   1/20/2014 4:00:01 AM
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_hm 

No, this is not for prototyping only. They are 3D printing titanium final products using this layered system. Did you watch the video?

-Susan

prabhakar_deosthali
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precesion spare parts manufacturing
prabhakar_deosthali   1/16/2014 8:42:06 AM
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I am just wondering about how much precision has been achieved by this 3D printing technique. If the precision is good and repeatability is also good then this is a good option for manufacturing of small parts which require high precision.

Especially say for watch repairers this could be a very handy technique when original parts are not available.

HaileyMcK
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Re: Looks good for prototypes
HaileyMcK   1/16/2014 1:21:28 AM
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@Ariella, it seems we've come a very long way in a relatively short period of time.

HaileyMcK
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Cost
HaileyMcK   1/16/2014 1:20:30 AM
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This is an interesting use case--and i suspect we'll see more of it. I read an article recently about a company that has developed a new lower cost titanium powder. In the past, the cost of titanium was prohibiitve and this new technology from a company called Metalysis has made the materials "radically cheaper." Here's a link.

_hm
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Re: Looks good for prototypes
_hm   1/15/2014 6:49:20 PM
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Is not machine making large scale commercial parts are called conventional machines?

 

t.alex
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Re: Looks good for prototypes
t.alex   1/15/2014 5:09:47 PM
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Yep, final products needs more finishing and polishing.

Ariella
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Re: Looks good for prototypes
Ariella   1/15/2014 8:53:40 AM
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@Susan very interesting that Austalia takes the lead in this. I know that GE 3D prints titanium for jet parts and has found it a great improvement. Back in December 2011, MIT Technology Review reported:"GE's jet engine division may be closer than anyone else to bringing 3-D-printed parts into large-scale commercial production."

Printing has helped the company save time and material when shaping titanium into strips that contribute to air flow. Before the printing technology was implemented, "tens of hours of forging and machining" went into shaping each strip, and about half the titanium went to waste.

_hm
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Looks good for prototypes
_hm   1/14/2014 9:06:07 PM
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This concept looks good to build prototype. For final product, one needs to certify this process for quality and reliability at 6 sigma level. This may be tricky thing to do.

 



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