Design Con 2015
DESIGN CHAIN     Today's Designs for Tomorrow's Innovations

Australia Leads in 3D Titanium Printing

View comments: newest first | oldest first | threaded
Susan Fourtané
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Looks good for prototypes
Susan Fourtané   1/20/2014 4:00:01 AM
NO RATINGS

_hm 

No, this is not for prototyping only. They are 3D printing titanium final products using this layered system. Did you watch the video?

-Susan

prabhakar_deosthali
User Rank
Supply Network Guru
precesion spare parts manufacturing
prabhakar_deosthali   1/16/2014 8:42:06 AM
NO RATINGS

I am just wondering about how much precision has been achieved by this 3D printing technique. If the precision is good and repeatability is also good then this is a good option for manufacturing of small parts which require high precision.

Especially say for watch repairers this could be a very handy technique when original parts are not available.

Hailey Lynne McKeefry
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Looks good for prototypes
Hailey Lynne McKeefry   1/16/2014 1:21:28 AM
NO RATINGS

@Ariella, it seems we've come a very long way in a relatively short period of time.

Hailey Lynne McKeefry
User Rank
Blogger
Cost
Hailey Lynne McKeefry   1/16/2014 1:20:30 AM
NO RATINGS

This is an interesting use case--and i suspect we'll see more of it. I read an article recently about a company that has developed a new lower cost titanium powder. In the past, the cost of titanium was prohibiitve and this new technology from a company called Metalysis has made the materials "radically cheaper." Here's a link.

_hm
User Rank
Supply Network Guru
Re: Looks good for prototypes
_hm   1/15/2014 6:49:20 PM
NO RATINGS

Is not machine making large scale commercial parts are called conventional machines?

 

t.alex
User Rank
Supply Network Guru
Re: Looks good for prototypes
t.alex   1/15/2014 5:09:47 PM
NO RATINGS

Yep, final products needs more finishing and polishing.

Ariella
User Rank
Supply Network Guru
Re: Looks good for prototypes
Ariella   1/15/2014 8:53:40 AM
NO RATINGS

@Susan very interesting that Austalia takes the lead in this. I know that GE 3D prints titanium for jet parts and has found it a great improvement. Back in December 2011, MIT Technology Review reported:"GE's jet engine division may be closer than anyone else to bringing 3-D-printed parts into large-scale commercial production."

Printing has helped the company save time and material when shaping titanium into strips that contribute to air flow. Before the printing technology was implemented, "tens of hours of forging and machining" went into shaping each strip, and about half the titanium went to waste.

_hm
User Rank
Supply Network Guru
Looks good for prototypes
_hm   1/14/2014 9:06:07 PM
NO RATINGS

This concept looks good to build prototype. For final product, one needs to certify this process for quality and reliability at 6 sigma level. This may be tricky thing to do.

 



More Blogs from Susan Fourtané
With the help of big data and analtyics, companies can produce a more efficient and agile supply chain driven by valuable data. But research suggests that Asia-Pacific manufacturers might need a little push.
Organizations may overlook the financial supply chain when doing a supply chain overhaul. Fully integrated financials, though are critical to good SCM.
What does it take to the manufacturing industry to integrate supply and demand via the Internet of Things?
Staying competitive in today's dynamic business environment requires a robust supply chain and market expansion.
Addressing transparency in the metals and mining sector must be a joint effort between supply chains and consumers.
Latest Poll
EBN Newswire
Twitter Feed
EBN Online Twitter Feed