Military Hardware Security Compromised

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Mr. Roques
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Supply Network Guru
Re: Difficult situation
Mr. Roques   12/23/2011 12:46:36 PM
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Well, in that case the US has a strong argument to stop contracts being fulfilled by Chineses companies... but they will have to pay extra for that. In difficult times, maybe the budget constraints is too big to listen to conspiracy theories.

Bolaji Ojo
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Re: Bullish Standpoints
Bolaji Ojo   11/20/2011 5:30:15 PM
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@pocharle, Counterfeiting is not widespread in aviation or anywhere else but it's no comfort. You only need one failed component to have a major calamity. Companies in the electronics industry are committed to fighting the problem but this is not enough. A more concerted effort is needed.

pocharle
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Re: Bullish Standpoints
pocharle   11/20/2011 3:55:19 PM
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Bolaji,

With some of the industries that you mentioned, is the distribution of the counterfeit goods widespread. Like, for example, aviation. I cannot fathom that Delta, for example, would buy goods from untrusted manufacturers. Don't suppliers/vendors have to gain some type of certification prior to selling goods?

Bolaji Ojo
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Re: Bullish Standpoints
Bolaji Ojo   11/18/2011 8:39:49 AM
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@pocharle, I realize the military is important but counterfeiting at any level can be extremely dangerous. In the medical industry, for instance, fake drugs, sub-par equipment and any other forms of counterfeiting can be as deadly as a weapons system with the wrong or faulty components. The story about the military grabs the headlines, however, counterfeiters are as active in other critical parts of the economy too. For instance, they are involved in aviation, industrial, home goods, etc. Counterfeiting is a danger to everyone.

pocharle
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Bullish Standpoints
pocharle   11/18/2011 1:26:03 AM
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Anything related to the military should always be protected with accuracy and reliability. But I come across many reports citing China's involvement in many hacking plots and information espionage. So what I would recommend the US do is disallow (at least): any products made in China should not be included in military hardware. Whether this is a realistic goal is another point but it's a starting point.

Bruce Rayner
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Re: Difficult situation
Bruce Rayner   11/15/2011 9:16:22 AM
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@Mr. Roques - The are separate but the fear is that they have and will overlap. There was a rumored case a few years ago of communciations equipment used by the US Navy that provided access to unauthorized (potential enemy) sources. There's the potential to embed viruses, and malwear in software and programable devices that can bring down systems. This is suspected as the cause of problems reported in computers used at the Iranian Nuclear site. There was also a report recently that the US Air Force's drone operations were hit by a virus. So the threat is real.

Eldredge
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Re: Difficult situation
Eldredge   11/15/2011 8:41:52 AM
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Good point on the replacemen parts. The design and testing for military hardware has had such a long cycle time that some components become obsolete during production phases. There is often the chance to make a 'last time buy' purchase, but repairs may be needed much further dowm the road. 

garyk
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Inventory Controller
Re: Difficult situation
garyk   11/14/2011 7:20:45 PM
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It's hard to compare Japan to CHINA. Japan didn't want to control all the manufacturing in the world, them just want there fair share. When various free country's talk about loss of job's it's because CHINA has taken all the low pay, manufacturing job's out of there country. When a country wants to expand manufacturing in CHINA, they say NO, only if they switch manufacuring to CHINA.

Do you all know that CELESTICA Canada is a Qualified Military CM owned by CHINA!!!! When will FOXCONN take over CELESTICA?

Mr. Roques
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Supply Network Guru
Re: Difficult situation
Mr. Roques   11/14/2011 5:10:38 PM
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How does counterfiting mix with espionage? I understand both are issues and both involve China but I think they are different topics.

Maybe I'm wrong, probably... are they related?

Hospice_Houngbo
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Supply Network Guru
Re: Difficult situation
Hospice_Houngbo   11/14/2011 2:42:04 PM
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@TaimoorZ:

For now China actions against conterfeit prducts will still be very limited because it is how chinese are learning new technologies. They copy to gain the knowledge to become more competitive. That is what the Japanese used to do in post wars periods (part of the second period of the 20th Century) until they become a well established industrial country and are able to offer competitive products. China will come to that, but we will have to wait.

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