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Technology Transfer Fuels Counterfeiting

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FreeBird
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Stock Keeper
Progress being made...
FreeBird   2/8/2013 8:57:21 AM
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From what I understand, there are efforts underway to reform export practices. For instance, the cutting edge technology that is not to be exported hasn't been updated for years. With the rate of change, I'd imagine CRTs might be on the do-not-sell list :-)

In spite of the government efforts, though, it is pretty clear that anyone who wants something can get their hands on it. If US companies aggressively defend their IP in the courtroom (against counterfeiters--not each other) it sends a message---whether anyone listens is another matter

CmdrDick
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Stock Keeper
Re: Tech Transfer early days
CmdrDick   2/7/2013 4:52:19 PM
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Those of us who are old enough will remember when our trade shows of the 50's and 60's were swarming with Japanese engineers. Every one of them was carrying a camera and they were taking very detailed shots of every product that we had on display. Don't think for a second that this was for home enjoyment. They studied the photos and markets, then bought copies of our products for reverse engineering. Now that China is doing the same to them, they are complaining.

Our early engineering knowledge ALL came from Europe, much from Germany, where high tech was coupled with quality. Anyone that believes that we didn't go thru our own version of reverse engineering to get where we are has their head in the sand.

We need controls on the release of technology for a period long enough to maintain a lead. The best way to accomplish this is "Made in America", and restrictions on the export of high tech designs. But, any way you look at it, when you crash the first one, the competition will be all over the pieces.

This is and will always be a large part of "progress". The Japanese suit will undoubtedly fail. They are foolish to think anything else. Actually, I find it amusing that the monopolistic guys that stuck it to everyone else are now in the receivers corner. Chuckle, chuckle. !

elctrnx_lyf
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Supply Network Guru
Technology transfer
elctrnx_lyf   2/7/2013 11:37:48 AM
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Technology transfer is always done for the business sake. I mean the Japan may not given the technology to china for free. When all the information is available all the companies try to design a similar product for the commercial and business purpose. The counterfeiting should be take care by stringent measures in supplier selection and supply chain management.

owen
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Stock Keeper
Researchers hope to make electronics that vanish
owen   2/7/2013 6:30:41 AM
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Hello Douglas,

I came across this a couple of weeks ago in GSN. It looks like DARPA is working on at least one solution...

"Defense Department researchers want to develop a new type of electronics that can be installed in everything from radios, remote sensors, listening devices and phones that can melt away when they're lost or have completed their mission."

http://www.gsnmagazine.com/node/28360?c=military_force_protection

I doubt it will end the practice but it couldn't hurt, especially when it comes to super-secret military technology.

Adeniji Kayode
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Supply Network Guru
Re: counterfeiting Technology
Adeniji Kayode   2/7/2013 5:06:51 AM
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@ Jacob, The question is where was the phone manufactured in the first place.

Is it not from the same China and this is not the first time its happening.

China has gained ground making similar products with low price when compared to the original devices too and for that ,people love them for what they are good at.

_hm
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Supply Network Guru
Re: counterfeiting & reverse engineering are different
_hm   2/7/2013 4:40:43 AM
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@Prabhakar: Yes, I agree with you. When I read it, I had same comments like you. One way to preserve market share is to release technology features in progressive way. i..e introduce new features when market share starts reducing. Also, keep doing more innovation and provide best quality at reasonable profit.

prabhakar_deosthali
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Supply Network Guru
counterfeiting & reverse engineering are different
prabhakar_deosthali   2/7/2013 12:46:40 AM
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The practice of reverse engineering of the competitor's product happens almost in evry company's  R & D department. I remember to have bought the television sets of all the brands that existed that time when our company was developing our own TV .

In India , in earlier times when the import of electronic product was restricted and also very expensive, many a companies would import one piece , and try to build an indigenous product by reverse engineering the same.

But in my opinion such reverse engineering cannot be called as counterfeiting as the reverse engineered product is sold under different brand name. Counterfeiting tries to fake a product as original by having the exact packaging and the product logo.

Jacob
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Supply Network Guru
counterfeiting Technology
Jacob   2/6/2013 11:46:42 PM
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1 saves

Douglas, counterfeiting the technology is the easiest way for competitors. As of now there are no options to stop such illegal things. When Apple released IPhone 5, with in a couple of days Chinese companies release similar product with all similar features. From where they got such technology? No answer, but its true that a certain percentage of such leaks are happening through employees.

rohscompliant
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Production Synthesizer
Tech Transfer
rohscompliant   2/6/2013 3:07:16 PM
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It is unfortunate that a US company or any other country for that matter has to succumb to the Technology Transfer extortion that the Chinese gvt imposes on 'outside' company's. But the allure of the Chinese cosumer market (etc) is to big of a carrot for company's to resist.......all in the name of shareholder value.

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