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New Ships Can Carry 22,000 Containers

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tommP
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These ships will be quite a sight,
tommP   8/6/2014 10:28:09 AM
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These ships will be quite a sight, too bad they won't be able to come to any port. There are many people out there who would love to get just a glimpse at them. The kind of people who already own their own boats and always check out MMIMarine.com would really appreciate them.

hash.era
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Re: petrol head
hash.era   6/30/2013 12:16:44 AM
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@Clair: Yes accidents are fewer for sure but the possibilities of things getting damaged is high. 

tirlapur
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Re: Unimaginable
tirlapur   6/22/2013 8:58:03 AM
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if these ships will only be able to go into certain harbors it may be a difficult job to ensure that stuff gets wehre it needs to be.

@Hailey, I totally agree with you. I think many majorts ports will need infrastructure upgradation so that these ships can enter them. At places where these ships cannot enter the ports we need to check the possibility of offloading the ship in mid-sea.

tirlapur
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Re: New Ships Can Carry 22,000 Containers
tirlapur   6/22/2013 8:35:48 AM
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It will be cheaper for sure, but the time taken for the shipments to reach the destination may be to carefully weighed against the money saved.

@prabhakar_deosthali, I agree with you. I think companies should use mix of bigger and smaller boats for shipments. This strategy will not only help them to save the cost but also help them to transport part of the shipment faster.


Lily
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Re: US Infrastructure
Lily   6/2/2013 10:12:12 PM
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Does the remodel include worldwide port redesign and rebuilding to suit this superlarge ship? Can it be possible to see such port revolution?

Douglas Alexander
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Re: US Infrastructure
Douglas Alexander   5/31/2013 8:36:53 PM
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Not wide enough, 2014 remodel underway.

shikantaza
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Re: US Infrastructure
shikantaza   5/31/2013 6:10:18 PM
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The Panama Canal IS NOT big enough for new very large ships.

The Panama Canal locks are 1000 feet (320m) long and 41 feet (12.5m) deep. It would require an enormous effort to build new locks and ensure the canal trenches are deep enough to permit passage of very large ships.

These dimensions are part of the reason the US ceded the Canal to Panama: it is of only marginal strategic interest because aircraft carriers cannot fit the locks.

Douglas Alexander
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Re: US Infrastructure
Douglas Alexander   5/31/2013 4:53:08 PM
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@Mr. Roques...The Panama is 70 feet deep and so yes the canal can handle it.

Mr. Roques
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Re: US Infrastructure
Mr. Roques   5/31/2013 3:49:58 PM
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So the project is thinking ahead? not just this 22,000-cointaers ship. In 35 years, there may be bigger ships.

What about the Panama Canal? They are expanding it, is this new boat the correct size?

bfinnecy
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US Infrastructure
bfinnecy   5/31/2013 3:11:18 PM
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Assuming that these ships one day make it to the US, do we have the existing rail capacity to disperse the containers?  Or what about highway systems and the increase in trucks needed to haul these?

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