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How Sustainability Practices Can Differentiate Your Business

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elctrnx_lyf
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Supply Network Guru
Re: carrot or stick
elctrnx_lyf   4/27/2012 6:26:19 AM
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COmpanies with long term vision should embed the initiative of enviromental friendly products. As more customers should be made aware of these practices and I believe educated customers and those who has sound understanding of nature could definitely buy only these products in the future. Please pass on the safe earth to our next generations.

stochastic excursion
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Stock Keeper
Re: carrot or stick
stochastic excursion   4/26/2012 1:17:07 AM
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Hopefully consumers take their cue from industry leaders when products are made that leave the minimum carbon footprint and consume a maximum of reusable materials.  The LA Times reported about a month ago about the whirling mass of plastic in the Pacific ocean estimated to be about the size of Texas, and there are a few others like it around the world.  We all can do more to transform our disposable society.

Anyway, sustainability is a virtue that can only benefit companies in the long run.  Companies that are in for the long haul--most likely companies angling for blue chip status--seem to embrace greener methodologies more.

Ariella
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re:
Ariella   4/25/2012 5:12:29 PM
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@prabhakar_deosthali I think it is possible to get the cooperation of the end customer, though they may need an incentive -- like a credit toward the next purchase when returning the piece for recycling.

syedzunair
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Re: carrot or stick
syedzunair   4/25/2012 1:45:02 PM
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@flyingscot:

I don't think it is because of the stick. It is probably because firms realize that the consumers are getting more educated these days. They will stand up for issues like pollution, conflict minerals being used in production etc. Therefore, it seems to me as a logical option to adopt greener business practices. It will ensure that the consumers will be satisfied with the ethical responsibilities of the company. Plus, with effective CSR and marketing they can also charge a bit more claiming that the green process does not come in cheap. 

prabhakar_deosthali
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re:
prabhakar_deosthali   4/25/2012 12:13:05 PM
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It is a welcome move that the companies are now treating - the taking back their old products and recycling them - not as a liability pushed onto them by regulations but  as a part of their social responsibility.

 

Can some of this responsibility be transferred to the end customers by making them obligatory to return their old products to the original company and not dump them alongwith other waste.

FLYINGSCOT
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carrot or stick
FLYINGSCOT   4/25/2012 11:02:06 AM
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I wonder what motivates companies to do this:  profit, altruism, fear of punitive measures?  Can companies really turn unnilateral "green-ness" in to bottom line dollars?

Barbara Jorgensen
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Greening
Barbara Jorgensen   4/25/2012 8:59:02 AM
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@Ariella: I agree. I believe that the more recent developments in sustainability are more tangible than the feel-good efforts of the past. My first-hand experience is with Avnet that has developed a significant after-market repair, reuse and disposal business. Rather than counting carbon credits, compnaies are actually taking old products and equipment and disposing of them responsibly. I also find such efforts to be more easily understood than the carbon credit system. Not that the credit system is bad, it's just hard to follow for a casual observer (such as myself.)

Ariella
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Supply Network Guru
sustainability
Ariella   4/24/2012 5:14:11 PM
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I consider such initiatives to be very commendable -- so long as they really do improve environmental impact and not just "greenwashing." 



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