Can Planning Help Thwart Counterfeiters?

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stochastic excursion
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Re: Counterfeit problem
stochastic excursion   9/14/2012 12:32:54 PM
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I would think an electron microscope would do the trick!  Wondering if even a low-magnification visual might uncover differences in the layout surface reflectivity pattern and so forth, between IC's.

Dynamics testing also highly effective, with prop delays and setup times typically uniform for a given part number.  But just thinking of a DOD issue with chips having higher functionality being re-tasked by foreign powers.  Depending on how real this issue is and how artfully the counterfeiting is done, this seems like it would present the most challenge.

Great info, thanks!

Barbara Jorgensen
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Counterfeit problem
Barbara Jorgensen   9/13/2012 4:49:15 PM
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@se: Yeah...what he said :-)

Thanks Dan!

ddeisz
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Re: Counterfeit Problem
ddeisz   9/13/2012 4:30:19 PM
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Bail-out attempt for Barbara.....I think you are correct in saying that a lot of counterfeit parts can be caught. The definition of "adequate incoming inspection" needs to be clear and I don't think most places take it to the degree necessary today. To date, the only agreed upon standard in this regard is visual (not dynamic) and it's not adequate in my opinion. SMT is pioneering visual-only inspection methods in detection of counterfeit. They are a broker and they do not do dynamic testing (seperate and much bigger problem determining long-term reliability). Their visual methods are really second-to-none that I have seen. Investments by SMT include SEM surface analysis, marking, die marking, scraping, etc..... That being said, doing dynamic testing using the OCM test program (like we do at Rochester) is the only real way to determine reliability of a product. Visual tells you nothing about reliability.

With regards to your question about not meeting specs enough to call a part counterfeit. Yes and no. It depends on the spec because the original part may not have met the spec either. We see this all the time with components controlled by source control drawings. If you do a comparative analysis (like we do at Rochester) on every single pin for every single parameter in a dynamic test environment on every replicated part, you have something on which to base the judgement. When it comes to products not governed by an SCD (standard product offering), your statement is correct most of the time.....most of the time.

Dan Deisz

Rochester Electronics

Barbara Jorgensen
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Re: Counterfeit Problem
Barbara Jorgensen   9/13/2012 3:28:49 PM
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@se: I believe the criteria regarding what is and is not counterfeit came from either the government or an industry association (I'll have to check the Webinar archives or hope Dan or George bails me out here.) It was a surprise to me as well: your definition matches mine. It makes sense that the performance of something as complex as a semiconductor would be taken into account; but it broadens the base of what devices are considered counterfeits and makes all the more difficult to spot them.

 

stochastic excursion
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Re: Counterfeit Problem
stochastic excursion   9/13/2012 12:52:26 PM
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Is not meeting specifications enought to call a part counterfeit?  To me a typical counterfeit part is a recycled or bad part that is packaged and falsely branded.  It seems to me that a lot of the counterfeits can be caught with adequate incoming inspection.

SP
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Can Planning Help Thwart Counterfeiters?
SP   9/13/2012 5:01:10 AM
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Definitely planning can help thwart counterfeiters. Counterfeiters dwell on demand for a component. If the companies allows some of their team's time to be spent on proactive obsolescence management, I feel many risks in the cmponent sourcing can be avoided. I remember when I was leading this kind of projects for Applied Materials, the team first used to analyze the complete BOM. Check which components are critical design wise. How many sources are available. For all the components check if there is any EOL listed. Talk to the manufacturer on their production plans for next  5 years. Then for components that are nearing EOL, raise a flag and take action. The team also made a database for automating some of these steps. It was a huge success, management found huge ROI in this. I guess for all companies that are in production, proactive obsolescence management must be mandatoty. Its win win for everyone involved

Barbara Jorgensen
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Re: Counterfeit Problem
Barbara Jorgensen   9/12/2012 5:04:38 PM
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@obsbuyer: That's good to know. It didn't occur to me until today that changing the packaging on a device can technically make it "counterfeit" in that it might misrepresent the device (at least as the manufacturer intended.) If there are agencies that can do this that are approved, that is the better course of action.

Barbara Jorgensen
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Re: Counterfeit Problem
Barbara Jorgensen   9/12/2012 5:01:41 PM
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@VG: Funny you should mention that. It was covered on today's webinar on counterfeiting, which will be available in archives soon. Although the component might be the original device, when you change the packaging it affects performance. So even though a device is "authentic" by most standards, changing the packaging and thereby misrepresenting the device (RoHS compliant or non-compliant) technically makes it counterfeit. That was news to me, but it makes sense when you think about it

obsbuyer
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Re: Counterfeit Problem
obsbuyer   9/12/2012 4:42:13 PM
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Don't forget often you can buy good ROHS parts from franchised distributors and turn them into non-rohs  and vice versa using  ANSI-GEIA-STD-0006 which companies like Corfin and Tin-Tronics perform. Corfin meets strict Navy standards because of the equipment they use. This has helped meet lots of time due to poor planning or EOL issues that you described.

VG
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Counterfeit Problem
VG   9/12/2012 12:23:50 PM
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Counterfeit has always been a problem especially companies that do not like to change or update their designs especially Medical and Military. Now due to RoHS, if not all good 50% parts are convereted to RoHS due to material restriction and upgrades, so problem is much higher than ever before.

I wonder why no one talks about RoHS as one of the biggest reason of counterfeit.

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