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Conflict Minerals Compliance Offers Opportunities

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Cortney
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Stock Keeper
Re: Ying-Yang
Cortney   6/11/2013 12:20:46 PM
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The compliance is lending to a closed loop minerals management system. The manufactures required to purchase conflict free minerals is a good thing for the world. 

Now the supply chain can become closed loop:

mineral supplier-> manufacture-> assembly-> end user-> refurbrusher/redeployment-> recycler-> smelter->back into primary material

The compliance laws & acts from the governing bodies should lead to responsible reuse and reduction of hazardous material starting or entering into unsafe hands.

These rules are leading to less warfare for minerals and cleaner water supplies. If companies desire to establish a legacy, they should want it to be conflict free.  Great PR

Do you know many places you can still landfill electronics, what most of the minerals are used for in manufacturing. This practice puts Cadmium, Lead, Mercury, Hexavalent Chromium or Chromium VI and Brominated flameretardants into the world's water supply. Many of these materials are recoverable and reusable materials.

it is understood human life is a fragile life form. Many people (of behalf of their company) are worried about paperwork ?...or is it about making another dollar at the expense of humanity? 


If procedure is followed, companies should be able to easily implement , shorter steps in their processes rendering them compliant.

Cortney Horstman
BCD Electro


 

FLYINGSCOT
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Supply Network Guru
not too clear yet
FLYINGSCOT   6/6/2013 12:59:51 PM
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So far I believe companies see this as a chore and not a real opportunity.  Only once the consumers are willing to offer loyalty to compliant companies will everyone willingly jump on the bandwagon.  I hope this is not the case but this is what I am seeing at the moment.

HaileyMcK
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Blogger
Re: Ying-Yang
HaileyMcK   6/5/2013 2:28:46 PM
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I've always lived by a "tell me what i've got and i'll tell you why it's what i want" and it seems that PwC has taken a leaf out of that book. It's a good idea. I suspect that there are hidden benefits in many of these business situations. I'm not a fan for compliance for compliance sake... it just leads to a lot of paper sitting around and not much action. however, well applied standards can yeild broader benefits than you might imagine. For example, HIPAA compliance can help organizations have peple who are more likely to be aware of other IT security best practices.

 

Does anyone have other examples of compliance yielding unexpected positive results?

R.J.Matthews
User Rank
Stock Keeper
Re: Ying-Yang
R.J.Matthews   6/5/2013 12:07:48 PM
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There are some obvious winners winners. Plus a few recent links people might find interesting.

http://blogs.wsj.com/riskandcompliance/2013/05/31/investor-groups-back-conflict-minerals-law/

http://www.zdnet.com/this-is-just-the-start-inside-fairphone-the-average-android-mobile-trying-to-change-the-world-7000016349/

http://beforeitsnews.com/gold-and-precious-metals/2013/06/the-conflict-over-conflict-metals-lisa-reisman-2505698.html (Noventa info out of date as it hit the buffers, Commerce resources data inaccurate tin market view ill-informed and does not mention wolf minerals as a possible tungsten play but some interesting bits)

http://www.sec.gov/divisions/corpfin/guidance/conflictminerals-faq.htm

https://www.itri.co.uk/index.php?option=com_zoo&task=item&item_id=2770&Itemid=177

http://www.supplychainbrain.com/content/single-article-page/article/secs-new-rule-on-conflict-minerals-clarity-and-confusion/

 

 

Tom Murphy
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Blogger
Ying-Yang
Tom Murphy   6/5/2013 11:41:25 AM
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Mike Bloomberg once pointed out to me that for every buyer on Wall Street, there's a seller. One will be a winner that day, and one will be a loser. So it goes with almost any business situation, including conflict minerals. 

Will you groan about the expense of compliance with these rules? Or will you happily pocket a profit?



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