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3D Printing Gets Beyond Star Trek

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Rich Krajewski
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Re: I'm not sure
Rich Krajewski   10/9/2013 5:44:17 PM
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Not bad at all. I'm not sure how the level of detail in dental work compares with the level in some jewelry, but, still, impressive.

Jim O'Reilly
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Re: I'm not sure
Jim O'Reilly   10/9/2013 5:16:55 PM
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I was at my dentist last week. They've just started printing temporary dentures and bridges in their office. It takes around 5 hours for the denture. Not bad!

Rich Krajewski
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I'm not sure
Rich Krajewski   10/9/2013 2:27:53 AM
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"Now, in addition to making designs more detailed, jewelers are able to take a piece from an idea to reality in just a couple of weeks."

I'm not sure if that is much of a speed advance. My wife did artwork for a custom maker of jewelry, and she tells me two weeks does not sound completely outside the realm of possibility for a rush job doing it the old way, with hand-drawn illustrations, and hand-carved molds and dies. But, maybe the 3-D printer doesn't need a pension.

I wonder how well the material used by the printer can reflect the 3-D printer's computer-controlled precision?

Jim O'Reilly
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Re: NASA agrees on Star Trek model!
Jim O'Reilly   10/8/2013 11:07:32 AM
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Hailey, The spare parts idea is really good.Keeping parts for years after a unit ships is expensive, and it takes time to get the part if you are not near a depot.

Hailey Lynne McKeefry
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Re: NASA agrees on Star Trek model!
Hailey Lynne McKeefry   10/7/2013 7:59:41 PM
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@Jim, i see this type of technology as being more like a "spare tire" of technology. i could see an instance where a need for a spare part could take a manufacturing line down and a three D printed version coudl save teh day at least until the part could be delivered. Is this in my head? Or does this happen?

Hailey Lynne McKeefry
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Re: New Stats from Gartner
Hailey Lynne McKeefry   10/7/2013 7:56:59 PM
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@Jim, it does look like we'll be hitting a tipping point in this industry sooner than any of us expected. It's going to be an interesting year coming up.

Ariella
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Re: NASA agrees on Star Trek model!
Ariella   10/2/2013 1:47:20 PM
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@Jim yes, and with the nearly daily advances in 3D printing, it's not at all beyond the realm of possiblity in the next few years. 

Jim O'Reilly
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Re: NASA agrees on Star Trek model!
Jim O'Reilly   10/2/2013 1:30:56 PM
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Ariella, I suspect printed circuit boards may soon be 3D-printed circuit boards.

Getting a prototype in an hour would be great!

Jim O'Reilly
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Re: NASA agrees on Star Trek model!
Jim O'Reilly   10/2/2013 1:28:24 PM
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Except fo some high end printing approaches using sintered metals, directly printed parts aren't usually strong or cheap enough for volume production.

Ther are exceptions. small parts can be economically generated by printing, and low volume, non-load bearing parts like logo plates are best done using the technology.

That will tend to change as printers get cheaper and faster. Remember how slow early PC printers were..technology has made huge speed improvements.

Jim O'Reilly
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Re: New Stats from Gartner
Jim O'Reilly   10/2/2013 1:23:12 PM
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I hope we get an explosionof good styling and innovative design with the expansion of 3D printing. That would resolve the hype issues!

Maybe a whole new genre of 3D printed sculpture is heading our way.

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