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LEDing It Hang Out: The Downside of Higher Efficiency

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Eldredge
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Re: In NH
Eldredge   3/18/2014 7:22:27 PM
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@deBayou'Gator - Yes - my tongue was firmly embedded in my cheek! Trying to pull it back out now.

deBayou'Gator
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Re: In NH
deBayou'Gator   3/17/2014 4:36:37 AM
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Safer? Pardon me?  I hope your tongue was in your cheek when you wrote that comment.

Fluorescent lights require special disposal, not just 'cause the mercury is easy to convert, in nature, to highly poisonous mercurous salts, but because the phosphors on the inside of the tube are toxic (e.g., but not limited to, carcinogenic).

Moreover, CFLs are limited in the same way as incandescent lamps: they require a(n electrically) heated filament to operate at all.  Filaments burn out.  In the year after I replaced 8 of 10 incandescent bulbs with new CFLs, I had to replace 6 of the CFLs but just 1 of the incandescents...and the latter had been in use for almost 10 years.  Greater efficiency is irrelevant if the lamp dies too soon.

The only downside to LEDs is that they're expensive to make.  On the upside, I've seen figures that estimate the useful life of some recent lamps as 100,000 to 300,000 hours.  The reason is that there's no filament to vaporize and fail.  Early versions DID fail because they caught fire and toasted themselves.  That's been corrected by transforming the incoming voltage to a lower value, improving the efficiency even further.

Eldredge
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Re: In NH
Eldredge   2/5/2014 5:47:22 PM
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I'm surprised that wasn't cited as one of the primary reasons to change to the more efficient and safer mercurey-doped version. Well, maybe I'm not surprised.

nimantha.d
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Re: In NH
nimantha.d   1/30/2014 10:09:30 PM
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@Rich: True cheap devices do have faults. So its always better to look into the reliability and the quality aspects as well without going for the cost only.   

rsanders
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SIMPLE AMENDMENT TO ENERGY ACT: EXEMPT 'COLOR COATED'
rsanders   1/29/2014 11:35:51 AM
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RED coating on an incandescent lamp, to allow a portion of visible light while eliminating use as 'general' illumination, is MUCH preferred to any 'black' or light-blocking use. And other colors than red should continue to be available.

Black: There are other 'unintended consequences' based on natural biological responses when animals are involved; rather than a black, no-light approach. For decades, incandescent lamps specifically meant for use as infrared heat sources have been 'dipped' to provide mirror-coating around the base (top, when installed inverted pointed downward) area, and with a cheap RED glass tint on the otherwise clear filament area that actually aids in the transmission of heat.

You will immediately recognize them in heater-fan combination fixtures in restrooms. They emit a red light, rather than being 'blacked out', which allows the maximum infrared heating transmission along with a small amount of red visible light.

Red glowing lighting has proven to be a natural attractant for especially the baby animals that seek out the red lighted area even when it is being mimicked by red LED lighting that provides NO heat. This is being tested by some commercial farms that use electric warming mats, which are typically black, to naturally 'urge' the infant and delicate animals to move over to the warming mat where their survival will be enhanced. The warming mat uses less energy than the typical 175W lamp used previously, but the animals do not appear to 'remember' or automatically find where the mat and warmth is until after a few days of life, and it is those first few days of life that matter most for survival.

Allowing 'any' screw-base incandescent lamp to be produced and sold at any wattage so long as it is fully dipped or tinted in 'some color' (including red) of 'at least ##% optical density' would be a suitable exemption to eliminate the non-lighting uses problem, including as a cheap indicator, resistive load, and for warming/heating.

 

 

GeoffThomas
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Re: In NH
GeoffThomas   1/29/2014 1:07:25 AM
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As a discrete heating source the old incendescent bulb is cheap, except when it starts a fire, - I notice that in modern laminators, eg A4 size are sold as little as $20;But i am talking here of the heating elements therein, - two long strips already wired up and with an LED to indicate on and an automatic thermostat to keep the temperature constant, - rarely do laminator heaters fail, usually it is the rollers jamming or the motor, - thousands are thrown away every day, probably the factory that makes the heating element could be induced to make them available separately from the laminator itself at a much lower price.

Just a thought.

Cheers,

Geoff.

Jacob
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Re:
Jacob   1/27/2014 11:44:35 PM
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"I think the legislation should only ban the use of incandescent bulbs for lighting, it should allow its use for such other purposes as load banks, heating element and so on where it is used as electrical load. Just to make sure that the bulbs are not used for lighting, they can be manufactured with black glass instead of the transparent or milky ones."

Prabhakar, why peoples prefer LEDs and CFL for lighting? This is mainly because of its power efficiency and low wastage, but at the same time advantages in power wastages are using in bakery ovens and incubators. There heat dissipation is important than lighting.  My question/ concern is when other technologies are there with better heat efficiency at a low power, whether we really requires incandescent lamps for this purpose.

Jacob
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Re: Surprise
Jacob   1/27/2014 11:37:20 PM
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"Do you think its possible ? I feel since there is more draining while using wifi the charging will not make a big impact at all."

Nimantha, I feel this comment is not relevant to this topic about LEDs and lighting systems.

 

nimantha.d
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Re: Surprise
nimantha.d   1/27/2014 5:23:30 AM
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@Jacob: Do you think its possible ? I feel since there is more draining while using wifi the charging will not make a big impact at all.

Jacob
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LED and OLED Bulbs
Jacob   1/26/2014 11:11:56 PM
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"It's not news that the venerable incandescent light bulb, which has served us so well for over 100 years, is on its way out. Through a combination of legislative mandates, local building-code imperatives, and operating-cost pressure, there's been a sequence of phase-outs, starting with 100W bulbs and working down to 75W, 60W and so on."

Bill you are right that incandescent lamps are gradually phasing out. Initially CFL made a strong presence in lue of incandescent lamps and now the turns are for LEDs. As a part of green building concept, LED and OLEd are widely using with star rated buildings, because of the low energy consumption and less energy wastage. As of now the drawback of LEDs are its higher prices, which comes up to twenty times of the ordinary buld of same wattage (Illuminent).

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