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Repair Teeth Without the Drill: Non-Volatile Memory in the Dentist Chair

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Himanshugupta
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Repair time
Himanshugupta   6/30/2014 1:07:06 AM
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Though its good technology and an alternate to drilling but what would be the typical time required to complete the procedure. If the rate of mineral accumulation is very slow then there is a problem. Also how discomfortable will the new technique be as compared to drilling?

prabhakar_deosthali
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Re: Repair time
prabhakar_deosthali   6/30/2014 2:49:36 AM
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I think this technology is still at the laboratory stage and a few years will be required to sort out all the technical and safety related issues to get the regualtory authority nod for use of this technology on patients.

 

Ron Neale
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Re: Repair time quantitative info needed
Ron Neale   6/30/2014 5:11:44 AM
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As this process appears to involve passing current into the fabric of the tooth and the possiblity of return paths through the body, safety will be of great concern and even when all the development has been completed there will be a certification period although it may be possible to some degree to run both in parallel.

As I stated, within the emerging NV memory community there is a great deal of experience of the current driven movement of material (ions and atoms) some wanted, some unwanted. It is difficult to comment further until we can move our level of information from the qualitative to quantitative. To that end I have submitted to the developers at King's College a list of questions requesting quantitative information related to their process. The list is as follows:

1)What is the Voltage?
2)What is the current or current density at the point(s) of contact? "Imperceptible current" is hardly a quantitative answer.
3)What is the pulse width, pulse shape and and repetition rate?
In other publications there is a quotation "low frequency electric currents" Does this mean AC or low repetition rate?
4)How is electrical contact made to the solvent or electrolyte and what route does the return  current take? One of the readers has raised the possibility of nerve damage could you address that problem?
5)How thick is the active material or electrolyte?
6)How long does the process take?
7)In other publications there is a quotation that cites a "healing hand piece" what is that. Is it something like the figure that has now been added as a speculative design to my EETimes piece.

Given the answers to all or some of those questions we should be able to make some further assessment.


Ariella
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Re: Repair time
Ariella   6/30/2014 10:45:08 AM
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@prabhakar_deosthali yes, not every innovation makes it to our own dental offices. I asked mine about lasers in place of drills years ago, and we don't have that yet What he did adopt recently, though, is on-site production of crowns. He used to have to send out to a lab for that.  

Susan Fourtané
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Re: Repair time
Susan Fourtané   6/30/2014 11:43:47 AM
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Ariella, 

3D printed crowns? They are becoming more and more common. There is a lab in Germany that has produced 3D printed crowns for years now. Very nice. :) 

-Susan

Susan Fourtané
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Re: Repair time
Susan Fourtané   6/30/2014 11:47:15 AM
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Humanshu,

Can you imagine anything more uncomfortable than drilling? :/ I welcome any technology that can replace drilling. 

-Susan

Ariella
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Re: Repair time
Ariella   7/1/2014 11:21:16 AM
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@Susan the software and machines my dentist used were from a German company. the caps were actually milled, drilled down from a cube of ceramic type material. After the shape was attained, the dentist added on color and baked it in a small version of a kiln.

Jacob
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Re: Repair time
Jacob   7/2/2014 4:32:03 AM
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"I think this technology is still at the laboratory stage and a few years will be required to sort out all the technical and safety related issues to get the regualtory authority nod for use of this technology on patients"

You are right Prabhakar. It may take time to get commercialized and for end user usage.

Susan Fourtané
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Re: Repair time
Susan Fourtané   7/2/2014 7:03:25 AM
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Ariella, 

How interesting. Yes, Germany seems to be a hub for everything innovative in dentistry. The price of the 3D printed crowns also being cheaper that regular old works. And faster.  

-Susan

Ariella
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Re: Repair time
Ariella   7/2/2014 8:40:40 AM
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@Susan I'm not sure what the actual difference in cost would be. As far as I know my insurance allows a set rate for the procedure, no matter which way the dentist obtains the crown. It probably costs him a bit less than sending out to the lab, but it also takes up more of his time. That's is why he said that for patients who want a whole set of teeth done, he would still have the lab do. Also the machine seems to have to form one crown at a time, so even at just 11 1/2 minutes a piece, it would still take quite a while to fill an entire mouth. And that time is on top of the time it takes for imaging, adjusting, and baking. 

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