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Hailey Lynne McKeefry
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Re: From the air
Hailey Lynne McKeefry   3/30/2014 6:45:58 PM
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@Adenjii, as I understand it it will be a feature of the phone, the ability to self-charge by harvesting electricity from the WiFi. It would work automatically whenever the phone connects to a wireless network. Sounds very cool right? Stay tuned, we are planning to write something about this soon.

Adeniji Kayode
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Supply Network Guru
Re: From the air
Adeniji Kayode   3/28/2014 3:49:23 PM
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@Hailey, Is this going to be at extra cost or free service by the operators.

Hailey Lynne McKeefry
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From the air
Hailey Lynne McKeefry   3/9/2014 6:17:38 AM
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Earlier this week, I was speaking with an IEEE engineer and he mentioned that some engineers are working on buidling components that could literally harvest electricity from a WiFi signal. That would mean that cellular phones, for example, might be able to go weeks between charges and smaller devices that draw less power could conceivably never have to be charged. I think there's some interesting stuff coming down the pike that we can barely imagine.

Jacob
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Various forms of Energy
Jacob   3/4/2014 11:26:31 PM
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"I was not thinking on the lines of "turbibe", but  about the heat generated by the friction of the water flow thorugh the pipes - potentially that could be converted to some kind of energy"

Prabhakar, energies are formed at various instances and occasions, due to many activities like walking, driving the automobiles, by flow of water etc. but as of now there is not any proper mechanism to harvest such energies.

Jacob
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New energy sources
Jacob   3/4/2014 11:24:07 PM
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"There's one more possible source that is truly ubiquitous but has been hard to capture: static electricity due to friction (it often appears as ESD -- electrostatic discharge -- and is considered a bad thing). But some recent work at the Georgia Institute of Technology may change that."

Bill, that's great news but how far it's possible to generate, collect and distribute this frictional energies? How about its amplitude, frequency and volts for domestic use.

Ariella
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re:
Ariella   3/4/2014 8:49:02 PM
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@Prabhakar I suppose it can and should. If it is not channeled in a positive way, wouldn't it likey form a problem of heat that has to be eliminated? 

prabhakar_deosthali
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re:
prabhakar_deosthali   3/4/2014 2:36:06 AM
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I was not thinking on the lines of "turbibe", but  about the heat generated by the friction of the water flow thorugh the pipes - potentially that could be converted to some kind of energy

Adeniji Kayode
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re:
Adeniji Kayode   3/3/2014 4:39:42 PM
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@ t.alex, Good point, but is turbine generated electricity not old fashion now?

t.alex
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re:
t.alex   3/3/2014 12:13:13 PM
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This is pretty good idea. All of these small flows can be combined into a big one which can easily drive a decent turbine for electricity generation.

prabhakar_deosthali
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Supply Network Guru
re:
prabhakar_deosthali   3/3/2014 7:30:05 AM
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One of the energy harvesting source that I can think of is the water supply piping in a building.

Normally water is stored in the overhead tanks and it gushes down the pipes whenever somebody opens a basin tap, takes a shower and starts a washing machine.

This flowing water thorugh the pipes generates some kind of friction and therefore some heat. If this energy is harvested , may be it could be used to pump the water up in the overhead tank.

 

 





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