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10 Robots You Don’t Want to Mess With

Our current crop of military robots includes some of the familiar small, tank-like unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) that move on treads or wheels. It also includes more specialized types like large autonomous vehicles that can drive themselves and carry big loads, along with remote-controlled versions of earth-moving machines.

Other military robots have wings and can be launched by hand or by tube. Larger versions have vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) abilities and can be sent to and from otherwise inaccessible locations. Most of these robots carry a wide range of audio, video, sensor, and communications abilities. One being developed by the US Navy carries its own fuel cell.

Click the image below for a slideshow 10 of the most intimidating robots employed by the US military.

The remote-controlled Avatar III tactical robot for first responders and SWAT teams has a 328-yard operating range. It includes a front-mounted drive camera, a high-intensity front headlight, an infrared light, a 360-degree pan-tilt-zoom camera, and a composite chassis that resists shock and water. The robot has secure WiFi for live video and audio transmission, as well as two-way audio operation and video and audio recording capability. Multiple robots can be run simultaneously on separate wireless channels. Front and rear flippers help the Avatar III climb stairs at inclines of up to 60 degrees and right itself if turned upside down. It can navigate multiple terrain types, including dirt, grass, sand, gravel, clothing, and water. The robot weighs 25 lb and measures 24.41 x 15.35 x 6.14 inches.(Source: Robotex)

The remote-controlled Avatar III tactical robot for first responders and SWAT teams has a 328-yard operating range. It includes a front-mounted drive camera, a high-intensity front headlight, an infrared light, a 360-degree pan-tilt-zoom camera, and a composite chassis that resists shock and water. The robot has secure WiFi for live video and audio transmission, as well as two-way audio operation and video and audio recording capability. Multiple robots can be run simultaneously on separate wireless channels. Front and rear flippers help the Avatar III climb stairs at inclines of up to 60 degrees and right itself if turned upside down. It can navigate multiple terrain types, including dirt, grass, sand, gravel, clothing, and water. The robot weighs 25 lb and measures 24.41 x 15.35 x 6.14 inches.

(Source: Robotex)

This article was originally published on Design News and republished on EBN's sister publication EE Times.

9 comments on “10 Robots You Don’t Want to Mess With

  1. Eldredge
    June 18, 2014

    If, by 'mess with', you mean play with the controller…count me in!  If, on the other hand, you mean become the object of the robot's interest….no thanks!

      These are some amazing machines, and they are only a subset of tactical robots that are available,

     

  2. itguyphil
    June 19, 2014

    I agree. I wouldn't want to be the object of the robot's affection either.

  3. Eldredge
    June 20, 2014

    @pocharle – The robot's affection wasn't really what I was thinking – but I wouldn't want that either!

  4. SP
    June 21, 2014

    These robots would be useful in sending to disaster areas where humans cannot go or its very costly to give away human life. Like search of missing airlinesetc.

  5. ahdand
    June 23, 2014

    @sp: Good suggestion but in disaster areas you do need to take quick decisions, so by sending robots will not be helpful to tackle the situations. 

  6. itguyphil
    June 27, 2014

    I know what you mean. By “affection”, I meant target. I don't think there's algorithms good enough to simulate real emotion.

  7. Wale Bakare
    June 28, 2014

    How do you mean by taking quick decisions? I think robots would be more useful  virtually for everything in years to come. Simply for efficiency reasons. Hardly could common errors often caused by human happen in case of robots, unless failure due to hardware or software.

  8. Wale Bakare
    June 28, 2014

    >>I don't think there's algorithms good enough to simulate real emotion< <

    Getting that may not be too difficult with the level of advancement World has reached today, especially in technology space

  9. itguyphil
    June 30, 2014

    The closest I can see now is something like Watson, but is that truly something that will be used everywhere? Unless the cost of use will be significantly less, then I think it can only be used for large organizations.

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