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'Big Three' Emerge in LCD Market

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pocharle
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Re: If Samsung
pocharle   4/22/2012 5:07:10 PM
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Rich,

Thanks for the reply. I am unsure of whether or not I read your post wrong but is Sony considering exiting the display industry for software dev?

pocharle
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Re: If Samsung
pocharle   4/17/2012 4:18:54 PM
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Well yes, same here.

As long as the quality continues to improve and they impress me with their product lines, let's hope it stays this way.

Who do you see as their main competitor in this space??

SONY?

pocharle
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Re: If Samsung
pocharle   4/15/2012 5:50:32 PM
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I think so. They already have a pretty decent stranglehold on the small to medium consumer base. Their displays are excellent. I find myself staring at their TVs whever I go through the electronics section at any store.

Why not try to take over the new thing too?

WaqasAltaf
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Showing the secret pocket
WaqasAltaf   4/14/2012 3:58:04 AM
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This is really a big development in LCD market which I think still has a lot of potential and consumers in many countries have'nt yet shifted to flat panel displays. When the lifecycle of any product (LCDs in this case) reaches maturity stage, the competition becomes intense and to grasp decent margins, new ways have to tried out to cut down overhead costs. So merger sounds good to me. This is also an indication that there was no further room for overhead cut down and merging production facilities was best way out.  

However, the best of three, in terms of quality looses out as it has to share its expertise with the partners in venture.

Barbara Jorgensen
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OLEDs
Barbara Jorgensen   4/13/2012 2:09:59 PM
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NoelB: Thanks for your well-thought out comment. In general, OLEDs are supposed to work better in sunlight (than LCDs) becuase they are not backlit, so it surprises me that your experience with them hasn't been optimal. But I do know that the larger the screen, the lesser performance OLEDs have. This could be one of those situations and if so remains a problem for overall adoption of the technology.

I agree with your point about technology reaching a plateau of sorts. It is hard to imagine the next product that is going to shake up the marekt like the PC did. And, while OLEDs have a number of advantages over LCDs, they don't revolutionize screen technology. Flat-screens are way better than CRTs, but when you get to the point where we are today with LCD TVs, it may not matter whether it is an OLED or an LCD in your living room. But I think there will always be a group of early adopters out there that will buy them anyway, and that's one of the things that keeps the market growing :-)

TaimoorZ
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Re: Govt support
TaimoorZ   4/13/2012 11:21:52 AM
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@FLYINGSCOT: I agree that the Japanese government has certainly taken a step in the right direction by investing in display companies. Displays will be a critical component in the future and I'm sure the investment will pay off very well for the Japanese economy and might establish Japan as the world leader in display products.

TaimoorZ
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Re: The next big thing
TaimoorZ   4/13/2012 11:18:54 AM
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I think OLEDs tend to lead in terms of their display quality and power consumption. As the production increases the price would come down. I agree that OLEDs would dominate in the future and penetrate very swiftly.

Jacob
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Re: The next big thing
Jacob   4/13/2012 8:58:54 AM
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Bolaji, narrow downing the market players can end up in monopolistic nature of business and finally customer may lose their choices.  If more players are there then there would be always a chance for health competition in terms of price and quality of products.

_hm
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Re: Very good post
_hm   4/12/2012 7:19:32 PM
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Very good coverage. It will be very interesting to see how Japanese and Korean companies and governement gets involved. Japanese organizations will give very good fight to Koean organizations.

NoelB
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Re: OLEDS
NoelB   4/12/2012 3:49:11 PM
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@Barbara: I agree with your assertion that AMOLED displays offer a superior viewing experience, but not under all conditions.  I recently purchased a Samsung Galaxy SII phone and the display is wonderful...indoors.  However, sunlight almost completely washes out the screen outdoors.  That will be less of an issue with for an indoor TV application, but window light/glare is still a consideration. 

I also agree with your statement about the consumer sales will only pick up once the price of an AMOLED TV gets within that magic 20% premium range.  This is a problem not only for OLED panel manufacturers, but for all high-tech industries (except for possibly drug manufacturing). 

Basically, my premise is simple:  Technology has come so far in recent years that premium-worthy product differentiation is much harder to come by now.  For example, color was a great improvement over black-and-white.  Digital signal was a great enhancement over analog signal.  Flash > CD > cassette.  And so on.  However, how much of an improvement (to the average consumer) is 1080p over 720p?  Blu-Ray over DVD?  LED over LCD or Plasma?  Only deep-pocketed consumers can find the value in the premium products, and those consumers might sit on the sidelines during a down economy.

So how are high-tech companies to succeed in developing the "next big thing" when competing as much against their own "last big thing" as each other?  The ROI on such significant R&D is not good.  I guess they can use engineered obsolescence...effectively eliminating the old design by forcing the components to become obsolete.  Or shortening the MTBF to force a quicker product turnover in the market.  But neither of those are attractive options.

Please understand, I don't think the world is flat.  And, yes, we really did need more than 64K of RAM.  But, I would be curious as to your thoughts on the future success of such technology development efforts in an established market such as TV.  Thanks.

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