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Warnings of Spectrum Shortages Resurface

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Barbara Jorgensen
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Spectrum (non) shortage
Barbara Jorgensen   4/25/2012 9:16:24 AM
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Really, TV is at the point where improvments are so incremental the only people noticing them are the developers and the service providers. You can buy a TV with better definition; you can use the correct cables to attach it to the box; you can even get faster wireless connections and guess what? They look a lot better than anything you saw two years ago. If service providers want to use the badwidth for services such as security and other useful things, more power to them. But stop improving the "TV experience" I can get on a cell phone. Seriously, is it really worth it?

syedzunair
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Re: spectrum shortage Versus 4K HDTV
syedzunair   4/24/2012 2:58:42 PM
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@WilliamK: 

I agree, 4K HDTV does seem to be the brightest of ideas. I cannot see much utility for it. 

Barbara Jorgensen
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Size matters
Barbara Jorgensen   4/23/2012 3:12:49 PM
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Good points about the amount of data that is being sent over existing spectrum. It does seem like some of these things are a waste of perfectly good spectrum. Like other readers, I'm skeptical about phone TV.

William K.
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spectrum shortage Versus 4K HDTV
William K.   4/22/2012 8:29:59 PM
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The article that I read described 4K HDTV at the same frame rate but 4 times as many pixlels, which looks like 4 times the data rate, hence, 4 times the bandwidth.  Of course there could also be a different mode that would need a lot more bandwidth than that. 

My point is that the whole excercise is a waste of time and resources, since the bandwidth can certainly be better used for almost anything else. Some ideas are just plain poor choices, no matter what, and the 4K HDTV format is certainly one of those poor choices.

_hm
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Re: Spectrum shortage?
_hm   4/22/2012 1:15:57 PM
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@Williams: 4K TV will need 4 time more bandwidth? Is it 4 times or much more?

 

William K.
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Spectrum shortage?
William K.   4/21/2012 10:40:43 PM
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I just read a posting about "thge next big thing" which is 4K HDTV. That would need 4 times the bandwidth to send it out . Sorry folks, but that Idea is STUPID beyond words. It does not matter how good the resolution is, we simply do not need it and it will not add any value to entertainment on TV. We do not need to be able to see the dots on the golfball and the blades of grass on the putting green. It adds no value. So just because somebody can design and build it does not make it a smart idea. Not all of the things that we can make will benefit society. 

The very best way to kill the supid concept of 4K tv is to not allow the specrum for the required bandwidth. 

bolaji.ojo
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Re: Spectrum shortages: For what?
bolaji.ojo   4/21/2012 11:29:16 AM
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William K., The shortage is a figment of somebody's imagination. I don't believe there's a shortage. If you've watched TV recently, you've probably found out that telephone companies are getting into the security and cable TV businesses. Cable TV companies are also getting into the telephone and home security businesses. Competition is increasing but while this is likely good for the consumer, it means these companies have realized there are many more ventures they can launch in future, hence their need for more spectrum and thence the "shortage."

bolaji.ojo
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Re: More please
bolaji.ojo   4/21/2012 11:25:31 AM
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Rich, That would bring us to a "Season of Anomie."

William K.
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Spectrum shortages: For what?
William K.   4/20/2012 7:35:01 PM
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The carriers don't need more spectrum, they need to limit what is sent. We simply do not need cell-phone TV! Get rid of that incredibly stupid idea, no matter how much they could make selling it. Then raise the rates for sending digital data until the amount sent does not overload things any more. Have the courage to charge enough to keep the demand down. The resulting profits will be obscenely huge and the shareholders will be rich and how will that be a problem, and best of all, it won't take any more spectrum.

Of course some will yell and scream about raising prices, but that is OK. Raising the price will solve the spectrum shortage, folks.

Cryptoman
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Making more money in the cheapest and fastest way possible
Cryptoman   4/20/2012 4:55:11 PM
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There are digital modulation, multiplexing and spread spectrum techniques to increase what is called the 'spectral efficiency' of communication systems. This is a popular research and development area and advances are made on this every year mainly on the theoretical part. As a referee of an international journal in communications, I have read quite a few articles on this topic in the last year alone. There are very creative ideas and proposals out there to be honest. However, until such research becomes fruitful as practical applications, a lot of time and investment is needed. I think the problem is the operators are not patient enough to wait for that long. The competition in mobile communications is fierce and there is a lot of money to be made for those who act fast.

Yes, WiFi networks are already out there and are fully functional. Yes, the mobile networks can interface to the WiFi networks via gateways thereby making much more efficient use of the available bandwidth. However, getting such gateways to run as efficiently as required is not a very simple task. Also, there are problems related to 'handovers between base stations' as the mobile users change locations whilst talking. There are other complications related to traffic loads and reliability matters that I am not going to get into. All in all, such integration and testing is a serious undertaking and can be costly.

Also, each trial of a new concept has many risks associated with it and therefore investors like to take the path that has been successfully walked before in order to save costs associated with unknown and known risks. For this reason, paying the cash to buy more bandwidth is technically the most straightforward and the least risky way of expanding an existing network using the same equipment that has been tried and tested many times before. When there is more bandwidth available, it does not take long before new subscribers are added and more money starts coming in. It's that simple.

Maybe buying extra bandwidth will cost more than developing new technologies to make better use of the available spectral bandwidth but getting this new technology to work as required can take time which will escalate the expected costs besides delaying the time to get the returns on investment.

 

 

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