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Data Points to More Onshoring

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FLYINGSCOT
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only to be expected
FLYINGSCOT   4/24/2012 6:11:38 AM
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I suppose it was only a matter of time before this happened.  Question is do US companies now seek other low cost areas or bite the bullet and make USA onshoring a desirable solution.

Anna young
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Re: Manufacturing moving back to US
Anna young   4/24/2012 6:28:40 AM
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The move to return manufacturing industry back to the US certainly makes economic sense for the industry. Several factors would have precipitated this move. For example labour gains are shrinking and wages are rising in China etc. I think it's the right move.

elctrnx_lyf
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coming back to home
elctrnx_lyf   4/24/2012 6:35:58 AM
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Finally many Industries in US will be happy about the manufacturing sector slowly coming back to home. Certainly many companies would realize moving manufactruing overseas may not be really beneficial like before considering the rising labor costs and also other ties between china and USA.

SteveCummins
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US or Mexico?
SteveCummins   4/24/2012 10:47:53 AM
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It's good to see some actual data on the subject, to support what many of us have been seeing over the last couple of years.

Two things surprised me though. Firstly, that labor costs were the #1 reason, when I think much of it is based on ease of doing business, and the fact that length of the supply change reduces flexibility. When a downturn hits, companies have 6 weeks of inventory on ships, and can't cut back quickly.

Secondly, there's no mention of Mexico production. Many companies are already located across the border, including Foxconn. They get the advantages of onshoring, but also benefit from lower labor costs and preferential government policies. So my guess is, a significant poriton of the production mentioned in BCG's article will actually go to Mexico.

jbond
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re:
jbond   4/24/2012 1:22:54 PM
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It's great to see some real numbers stating the onshoring movement is under place. With rising costs of labor overseas and the continued rise in fuel prices, many companies would be better off with returning to the states.

syedzunair
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Re: US or Mexico?
syedzunair   4/24/2012 2:47:27 PM
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@Steve: I agree with you. The Mexico factor will play an important role in determining where the production actually lands. On paper, Mexico with comparatively cheaper labor and less strict laws seems to be a better option. 

Harry Moser
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Total cost of offshoring
Harry Moser   4/24/2012 11:34:23 PM
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The article ends with "70 percent agreed that "sourcing in China is more costly than it looks on paper."   The easiest way to find the actual or total cost is to use the free Total Cost of Ownership Estimator(TM) at www.reshorenow.org.

prabhakar_deosthali
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Once bitten twice shy
prabhakar_deosthali   4/25/2012 6:54:56 AM
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I think the last decade has been a learning excercise on the offshoring of business for the US industry. The lessons learned from it will help US industry to become choosy on what to offshore and what to keep onshore. It will also help the US manufacturing ti restablise itself and also bring back some sense of self pride among the US manufacturers.

For common man , the final product cost anyway will continue on the upward trend

Barbara Jorgensen
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Onshoring and cost--enough already!
Barbara Jorgensen   4/25/2012 9:10:20 AM
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Judging by reader comments, we have a better-informed constituency at EBN than in the general public. I wish companies would cease using the labor cost argument entirely. It is, and always has been, a small part of the cost in electronics manufacturing. The reason we see thousands of workers on an assembly line at Foxconn is becuase that is the way Foxconn set up the business. In Brazil, Foxconn is implementing robots and automated lines. I think any company that wants to manufacture in the US, or Europe or Japan has a cost-effective solution to do so. Enough already!

tech4people
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Jobs are returning to the US??? The WSJ begs to differ...
tech4people   4/28/2012 3:56:45 PM
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Barbara,

I read the Piece from The BCG that you linked to here and knew  for sure that is not the case on the ground in America.

Sure enough,Here's evidence from the Wall Street Journal

American companies are adding Three times as many Jobs overseas as in America today(Some major employers continue to cut jobs)

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303990604577367881972648906.html

So much for onshoring and employment returning back to the US....

And they are massively benefitted by all the Cheap Credit and Loans that they get here in America(thanks to our Zero Percent Interest rates).

If you compare that with say a Chinese company or an Indian Company for instance;Corporations there have to pay higher(much-much higher) borrowing costs than in America.

And,lets not forget one more thing-Ordinary Americans are very much at the losing end of this current Zero percent Interest rate regime today(as Inflation is much-much higher,in some cases as high as 10per cent today).

Unless Americans are prepared to ask their representatives in Congress why this is the case,nothing will change.

Regards

Ashish.

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