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Thai Floods Recede, But Damage Remains

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Kunmi
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Re: Thai floods
Kunmi   11/25/2011 8:57:27 PM
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That reminds me of a friend that saw in the news how Thailand was being flooded and he said that what would become of rice exportation? Knowing that major food that they produce is rice which is accepted world wide; and I can imagine the impact this floods would have made on food supply chain?

pocharle
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Re: Thai floods
pocharle   11/19/2011 10:20:48 AM
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We can't predict when natural disasters may happen, but when it does happen, it always affects many lives severely, as these floods had already took 500 lives and left 50,000 people unemployed. The worst part, it takes years to rebuild the entire country's economic stabililty, as the floods have a big blow on it.

Marc Herman
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Re: Thai floods
Marc Herman   11/16/2011 9:33:46 AM
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Thanks Barbara. I should say for the record I'm not on the scene; I'm not even in Thailand. But it is wierd how little attention this has gotten, even from those who are, in theory, able to put people right there.

Barbara Jorgensen
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Thai floods
Barbara Jorgensen   11/16/2011 8:54:26 AM
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Marc--thanks for your on the scene reporting. EBN continues to get inquiries about the situation and it is great to point to our own site for some of the best information available. Outside of the supply chain, this tragedy has barely been mentioned in the mainstream media. And thanks for continuing to recognize the human toll associated with the floods. I hope we never neglect--we being the collective media--never fail to remember what's really important.

Jacob
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Re: Floods Recede, But Damage Remains
Jacob   11/16/2011 2:28:21 AM
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1 saves

Marc, itís true always. The after effects of disaster can reflect in economy and production line for a certain period.

TaimoorZ
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Re: Stay or Go?
TaimoorZ   11/16/2011 12:15:13 AM
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While no one can completely guarantee protection against natural disasters, but it's always important to have contingency plans especially if it's disasters like flood which are likely to occur every year. I think Thailand and other places with large amounts of rainfall should seek to develop industrial areas on highlands where the damage by rains and floods is minimum.

Mr. Roques
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Mr. Roques   11/15/2011 3:36:40 PM
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Whoa, didn't know about Thailand's floods until this morning. Real tragedy! monsoon season strikes again.

I was reading that theres a company in Thailand that produces most of the motors that hard drives use, so there's a definite advantage of having all the companies close.

10% price increase seems optimistic, after I read all the info.

Marc Herman
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Re: Stay or Go?
Marc Herman   11/15/2011 1:44:56 PM
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Indonesia is a wonderful, wonderful nation. It is perhaps not the place to go to safeguard one's self against natural disasters, however....

TIOLUWA
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TIOLUWA   11/15/2011 1:40:50 PM
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This just casts my mind back to the rescent discussions on why manufacturers are trooping to China.

Hawk's question is important, in asking what other locations are available for manufacturers, we are also asking what other locations offer the same benefits as Thailand does, which also leads to the question: What benefits do manufacturers get from manufacturing in Thailand, and do they really have options.

I think by now we at EBN should have accepted the fact that there is more to siting a factory or outsourcing than the issue of cheap labor costs.

Ariella
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Re: Stay or Go?
Ariella   11/15/2011 1:36:36 PM
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Honestly, Hawk, I wouldn't know if the companies would do better elsewhere, though, as you suggest some countries would love to have the opportunity to host them.

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