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Is It Time to Ditch Your Cable?

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Susan Fourtané
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Re: Give Up Cable?
Susan Fourtané   12/9/2011 11:37:33 AM
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cedargin,

I love your comment. I gave you five stars for being one of the best things I have read today (apart from Bolaji's blog about the truth of made in China). 

I agree with every word you have said here. I don't miss TV either, not even a bit, not one day, the same as you I haven't owned one in hundreds of moons, not having TV has been one of the blessings in my daily life. 

-Susan 

cedargln
User Rank
Stock Keeper
Give Up Cable?
cedargln   12/4/2011 6:35:19 PM

Give up Cable?  Haha!  Beat you to it.  I have not owned a functional television set for more than 15 years; no plans  to buy one.  WIth some years experience behind me, I can fairly report:  Living without TV is a joy.  Living without TV is not difficult.  Living without TV allows me even more freedom to do the necessary and on MY schedule.  To Hell with TV and cable and all that goes with it!

Do I miss much?  Not really.  News and current events come via the internet or even the old-fashioned, printed word.  Do I miss the pictures and videos?  NO.  Pix and vids, when necessary, are available via the net and usually full-screen, without those disgusting banners that eat up so much space on a TV screen.  Some will say that the entertainment portion of TV is an American Treasure.  Fine, for them.  I see it as mostly junk. In the case of some exceptional program, it can usually be had via the net, if perhaps at a later date.  In fifteen years without TV, I've sought a specific program exactly once.  Got it?

Cable is a miserable rip-off, fostered on folks who too often follow the crowd. The programming is cheap, superficial and designed to dumb-down the watcher.  It is also laden with advertising that is not necessary.  Cable is worthless.  I might consider it when they start paying me to at least have it available.  Short of that, hell no!  there are several reasons. For informational programming - news and good documentaries, etc., the factual content is minimal and often poorly delivered.  The spoken word is a waste of time:  I can read 4x - 5x as fast as the typical video journalist speaks.  If they's just publish their script and skipt the talking heads (and embedded opinions) I can easily absord an hour long program's material (about 38-40 real minutes) with 6-8 minutes of reading.  If it is complicated stuff, perhaps 10 minutes.  In short TV and cable is a collosal waste of my time.  No thanks.  I also dislike the bias that so many talking heads include.  Even if unintentional, it is there and it stinks.  The written word can also include bias, but it is much more difficult to hide.  Lastly, I do not need or appreciate "Production Values."  Pretty pictures do not convince me and overly graphic details will not change my values.  I know what beauty and pleasure look like and I know what death and misery look like.  Spare me.  Please, journalists, just report the facts. 

Back to basics.  Cable?  Hell NO!  TV of any kind?  Hell No.  Learn to read and find the appropriate sources for the written words that you need.  Amen.

Eldredge
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Supply Network Guru
Revising billing methods?
Eldredge   12/2/2011 2:37:26 PM
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In an earlier post, I suggested that, since my cable TV and internet services are provided by the same company, all they have to do is revise their billing schedules to make up for the internet access to programming.

On the way to work this morning, I heard a statement that service providers are looking at billing baes on useage, like the electric companies do. That accomplishes the goal (for the service providers).

Barbara Jorgensen
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Blogger
Cable and "no ads"
Barbara Jorgensen   12/1/2011 2:36:07 PM
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Some of the on-demand programs I watch have more commericals than if I were watching a program live, (that's you TNT) and they disable the fast-forward feature. No fair

stochastic excursion
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Stock Keeper
Re: Big Reason
stochastic excursion   11/30/2011 3:43:21 PM
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Cable is losing ground to on-line content, but it's going to be a while before it's replaced completely.  The way content deals are made is a major issue--for example Viacom has sued Time Warner because it claims it doesn't have the right to allow Viacom content to be streamed on an iPad.

FWIW cable has a regulatory framework that mandates basic service for under $40/month.  Another thing to consider is some cable companies offer packages that include bundled cell phone service, so they could be the pipe where you get your on-line content.

Damilare
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Stock Keeper
Re: Big Reason
Damilare   11/30/2011 9:26:37 AM
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You're right michell. Online streaming look no different from TVs this days and will continue to do better. I personally watch everything online. its cheap and you have a huge range of programs and channels to choose from.

TaimoorZ
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Supply Network Guru
Re: Cable and Internet
TaimoorZ   11/29/2011 1:27:17 PM
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@Himanshu: The "no ads" feature is certainly a very important plus point for internet TV compared to the plethora of ads on normal cable. However, I don't think they'll be able to survive with this model for long. Ads is the ultimate source of revenue for content providers.

pocharle
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Supply Network Guru
Re: Cable and Internet
pocharle   11/29/2011 12:48:28 PM
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I agree. Especially when the providers here in the US pretty much have a monopoly in certain areas & increase prices alomst 20% in some areas year over year.

Himanshugupta
User Rank
Supply Network Guru
Re: Cable and Internet
Himanshugupta   11/29/2011 12:33:21 PM
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i recently did some experiment on the content and quality of programs between cable tv and internet. As most of the content that we see on cable is also available on internet (via streaming or paid) so i found that i could enjoy more on internet (without ads; thank heaven God) the content. I have more than 100 cable channels but in the end i keep on flipping between channels to find the program that i like. So, if i have unlimited internet bandwidth and at a reasonable cost then i do not need cable.

TaimoorZ
User Rank
Supply Network Guru
Re: Cable and Internet
TaimoorZ   11/29/2011 11:51:31 AM
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Given the low rates that Internet TV has, the variety of content available and the flexibility it offers, I don't think cable TV can survive for long. It's only a matter of time before cable dies its natural death.

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