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Japan’s Semiconductor Malaise... & Sumo

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Hospice_Houngbo
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Re: What Happened to 'Japan Inc'
Hospice_Houngbo   4/30/2013 9:54:24 AM
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@HM,

As a matter of fact there is a reason why Japan is the 3rd largest economy in the world as of 2012. I had been in the 2nd largest for a while before it was eventually replaced by China. Japan has a strong manufacturing indistry, but it mostly relies on foreign markets to sell its produtcs.

HM
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Re: What Happened to 'Japan Inc'
HM   4/30/2013 4:17:59 AM
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yes of course japanese production methods must be great thats why they produce world class products.

TaimoorZ
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Re: What Happened to 'Japan Inc'
TaimoorZ   4/29/2013 7:24:17 PM
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@HM: I've studied the Japanese production methods in detail and have also read cases on how some of the Japanese companies were able to transform themselves to improve quality and reduce cost. The objective of these was to work smarter rather than work harder. Most of these companies did not have long work hours. They simply tried to restructure the tasks and process flows to make things more efficient at the same time incorporating quality into the process itself.



TaimoorZ
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Re: A greater crisis?
TaimoorZ   4/29/2013 6:56:47 PM
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"Too much quality... Prices have to be higher than competitors."

@Mr. Roques: I don't think the Japanese philosophy was just to increase the quality. I think the moto was improving quality and cutting costs at the same time through elimination of waste. All the big Japanese firms including Toyota seemed to have adopted that.


HM
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Re: What Happened to 'Japan Inc'
HM   4/27/2013 8:59:45 AM
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Interesting comparison. Have seen some of the teams working for Japanese customers, the team members used to work round the clock. The Japanese counterparts used to do so much micromanagement that sometimes people feel why do they ourtsource it. 

Ned Ludd
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Re: What Happened to 'Japan Inc'
Ned Ludd   4/26/2013 3:13:48 PM
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Ah, well. No sports fans here...

 

AzmatMalik
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Production Synthesizer
What Happened to 'Japan Inc'
AzmatMalik   4/25/2013 8:57:02 PM
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Some years ago (2005) on an overseas Exec Business Education program I was teaching, I ran into a young Japanese (woman) professor who was studying the role of Iraq, Iran, Palestine, etc mothers in the 'development' of 'suicide bomber' children.  We talked privately over dinner, among other topics we discussed the causes of the change and decline of Japan's economy.  She broke down with a 'you Americans have destroyed my country again'. Now, I know that many others say that the US is the cause of problems in the world, but I didnt expect it from an educated Japanese.  The point was that by 'falling' for American management practices, short-term (stock market driven) management consultants the well established had lost their way.  

I was aware then of several Japanese semiconductor companies (NEC Hitachi Fujitsu Mitsubishi) who had been blinded by the soaring valuations on the dotcom driven stock market. They wanted to 'go public' and 'rakein lots of money'.  They hired investment banks. Brand consultants. Manageent consultants. And indeed lost their way to short-term US-view corporatism.  There were first-ever layoffs. Factory shutdowns.Divestitures. Staff that out of a long-term and cultural loyalty to the 'company' saw the blood around them; those who used to work 20-hour days and travelled away from home for weeks on end, were suddenly 'numbers only'. Loyalty and productivity suffered. Mergers took place between companies that had very divergent cultures. (Even in the 'best of times' it is rare that a merger results in 'value add' for the business; though it does for the consultants and investment banks.)  These mergers were guaranteed to fail. And fail they did.

So: The malaise has little to do with sumo, and much to do with management losing their way. It has little to do with 'too much quality', and a lot to do with trying to adopt a culture that is not natural to you. 

It is sad that municipalities all over the world are trying to 'create' their own Silicon xxxx (valley, alley, wadi, etc). That will not happen; the sovereign wealth will be wasted on expensive consultants and advisors who can write all manner of proposals and business plans. But the base doesnt exist there. Silicon Valley (the original one in California) happened over many years, because of the confluence of numerous factors in place and time, factors which will be difficult to replicate in any short order.

FLYINGSCOT
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FLYINGSCOT   4/25/2013 11:57:46 AM
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Sumo will go the way of caber tossing in Scotland and that is limited participation by raving loonies and entrepreneurs who perfrom for the tourists ;-) 

Hospice_Houngbo
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Re: A greater crisis?
Hospice_Houngbo   4/25/2013 10:05:46 AM
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@Mr. Roques,

I think, Japan manufacturers are mostly suffering from the global economic crisis not because of the good quality of the good quality of their produtcs. Many consumers can no longer afford costly products, but this doesn't mean that they want to buy poor quality products.

Lily
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Inventory Controller
Re: A greater crisis?
Lily   4/24/2013 10:09:44 PM
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It is very strange, isn't it? Quality causes crisis. 

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