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Google Glass & Lookalikes Find Niches

Portland, Ore. — Real-world applications of head-mounted displays (HMDs) like Google Glass, Epson's Moverio, and Recon's Jet have been a solution looking for a problem. But the applications for these head-worn output devices are finally materializing thanks to their integration with an appropriate input device: the Thalmic Labs' Myo — an armband controller that is bringing real world applications to Google Glass, Epson Moverio, and Recon Jet.

“Myo is a more comfortable interface to a HMD than a touchpad,” said Scott Greenberg, director of development at Thalmic Labs Inc. in Waterloo, Canada. “It solves the problem of controlling the display without having to touch or talk.”

Thalmic has been working on integrating Myo with Google Glass, Epson Moverio, and Recon Jet for about six months and already has a half dozen real-world applications under its belt. One of the most appropriate has been medical applications, since there are dozens of situations where a doctor need hands-free access to reams of clinical information that cannot be easily recalled with voice interfaces.

For the full story, see EBN sister site EE Times.

— R. Colin Johnson is the Advanced Technology Editor of EE Times.

18 comments on “Google Glass & Lookalikes Find Niches

  1. FLYINGSCOT
    August 27, 2014

    I encourage others to take a look at Myo on the web.  It is pretty cool technology. However I am not a believer that Google glass type products will really take off in huge volumes but I am usually wrong anyway 😉  

  2. Nemos
    August 27, 2014

    “I am usually wrong anyway”

    @FLYINGSCOT Have you already purchased glasses like the above ?, can you give more details about I am usually wrong 😛 ?  

  3. Nemos
    August 27, 2014

    “It solves the problem of controlling the display without having to touch or talk.”

    That generates a huge question mark how that is possible ?, what you do then ? 

  4. prabhakar_deosthali
    August 28, 2014

    In a surgical procedure, where the doctor may probably use google glass to assist him in the precise navigation in an intricate operation, the hand gestures may become an hindrance rather than convenience 

  5. ahdand
    August 28, 2014

    @prabhakar: But still the glass will direct him isn't it ? 

  6. prabhakar_deosthali
    August 28, 2014

    @Nimantha

    Yes off course!

    Just a couple of months back I read a news artcle about an Indian doctor using Google glass to broadcast the surgical procedure he performs to his interns. So that application is already proven . 

  7. Himanshugupta
    August 28, 2014

    I think there are lots of things that we would want to do without touching or hand engagement. And the most common is during driving. Unfortunately today's traffic laws do not allow us to use mobile devices during driving as they can distract driver. 

  8. Nemos
    August 28, 2014

    “Unfortunately today's traffic laws do not allow us to use mobile devices during driving as they can distract driver.”

    That it depends where are you living, in Sweden for example you are allowed to use your mobile phone while you are driving.

    NOTE:  Sweden has one the lowest accident  rate in Europe.

  9. Houngbo_Hospice
    August 30, 2014

    @Nemos,

    it is common sense to avoid distraction while driving, law or no law. Mobile phones can become a major distraction for a driver especially when the hands that are supposed to hold the wheels are used to operate the device.

  10. Houngbo_Hospice
    August 30, 2014

    @prabhakar.

    That is a very useful application for Google glass indeed. But there is nothing new here as it is just a fancy way to do video conferencing.

  11. Taimoor Zubar
    August 30, 2014

    “That is a very useful application for Google glass indeed. But there is nothing new here as it is just a fancy way to do video conferencing.”

    @prabhakar: I don't think it's just a fancy way. It's adding more convenience and making the experience better. I think it is giving the right value for the money.

  12. Taimoor Zubar
    August 30, 2014

    “Unfortunately today's traffic laws do not allow us to use mobile devices during driving as they can distract driver. “

    @Himanshugupta: I agree. I feel the need for a reform in the driving laws as well. These devices are meant to help the drivers in navigating and performing other functions. I think the conventional laws don't apply anymore.

  13. Nemos
    August 30, 2014

    “it is common sense to avoid distraction while driving” yes but you speak by heart and you just have ignored the information I have posted. It is clear that mobile phones are not directly connected with the distraction.

  14. Taimoor Zubar
    August 31, 2014

    “Mobile phones can become a major distraction for a driver especially when the hands that are supposed to hold the wheels are used to operate the device.”

    @Hospice: This is why you need alternate forms of interfaces such as voice commands or gestures so that the driver doesn't have to use hands while driving. I'm pretty sure in the future we shall see some development on this and things like a retina controlled windscreen of the car will appear.

  15. Houngbo_Hospice
    August 31, 2014

    I undestand your point. It is making the experience better. But can't we do the same with conventional video conferencing tools?

  16. Houngbo_Hospice
    August 31, 2014

    @Nemos,

    “It is clear that mobile phones are not directly connected with the distraction.”


    Really? Using mobile phones while driving can distract drivers, especially if they are used for texting.

  17. Nemos
    September 1, 2014

    yes @Hospice , otherwise how you justify that in a Country that you can use your mobile phone instead of having a markable amounts of accidents you have a very safe driving environment.

  18. Eldredge
    September 22, 2014

    One of the most appropriate has been medical applications, since there are dozens of situations where a doctor need hands-free access to reams of clinical information that cannot be easily recalled with voice interfaces.

    I could envision a surgeon requesting medical information, patient records, or other necessary medical support through voice commands, or with the support of an assisting medical technologist providing the information directly to the physician's device.

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