Advertisement

Blog

Internet, Apps & Now Hardware

Beware, hardware is back in vogue. Web designers, software developers, and non-engineering professionals with no prior experience in designing a system are turning their attention to hardware, according to Peter Hoddie, Marvell's Kinoma vice president.

Everyone knows how the Internet changed the design engineering world. Hoddie tells us that was the first wave. It profoundly affected the way engineers think about the user experience, software, and system designs. Then the mobile wave hit, sucking every developer's energy into mobile apps, even for a system design. If anyone was developing a system without mobile apps, well, forget about it.

“Now, I see the next wave emerging,” he said. “It's hardware.”

Peter Hoddie, Marvell's Kinoma vice president.

Peter Hoddie, Marvell's Kinoma vice president.

Hoddie, who developed QuickTime at Apple, now heads the Kinoma team at with Marvell. In a brief chat during EE Live! this week, he talked about how hardware is triggering the next revolution. He was referring to the industrywide movement revolving around Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone, PCduino, and other development boards — including Kinoma Create.

Those who might be domain experts but have no hardware engineering experience are getting eager to ride the hardware wave, especially in the context of the Internet of Things. “While some of these developers are making the leap, many more are looking on curiously from the sidelines, wanting to give it a try.”

Marvell's Kinoma team, who came to the EE Live! show and demonstrated the Kinoma Create module at Microchip's booth, is pitching its newly designed JavaScript-powered IoT construction kit. According to its Indiegogo page, the kit includes:

  • A QVGA capacitive touch screen
  • An 800 MHz Marvell Aspen system-on-a-chip)
  • WiFi (802.11b/g/n) and Bluetooth wireless connectivity
  • USB 2.0, including USB On-The-Go
  • 128 MB RAM, 16 MB SPI Flash
  • A microSD slot
  • A speaker and microphone
  • Wired (USB) and wireless (with optional battery) power options
  • Digital input/output (20-36 GPIO, configurable)
  • Analog input (0-16, configurable)
  • I2C (one physical bus and two soft buses)
  • UART (one physical bus and two soft buses)
  • PWM (3)

Inside look at Kinoma Create.(Source: Marvell)

Inside look at Kinoma Create.
(Source: Marvell)

The company said that no breadboard is required for many breakout board-based sensors, and there is custom, lightweight Linux distribution to support the Kinoma platform.

The Kinoma Create mission is to simplify the hardware and software experience, “so more developers jump in and begin to make, create, and tinker with hardware,” Hoddie said.

Creating superstars
As the Indiegogo crowdfunding deadline draws near (the campaign will close in two weeks), Marvell has sold more than 400 kits thus far. That's a small number when viewed through traditional semiconductor business practices, where big IC suppliers like Marvell have always striven to sell their ICs to marquee brands in big volume. But the Kinoma team's move illustrates big changes happening in the way chip vendors do business.

The team hopes to create a new way to reach small and midsized companies. It also hopes to build a community around Kinoma Create developers. Hiring 500 field application engineers to support those who buy Kinoma Create was hardly a methodology preferred by Hoodie's group.

Since customers are ordering Kinoma Create for $100-$150 with their credit cards, “we now know who those people are,” he said. “That alone is a big shift” in building relationships with customers. “But, of course, that's hardly enough.”

Between now and September, when Kinoma Create is scheduled to start shipping, the Kinoma team hopes to ensure enough documentation, sample projects, and example applications for Kinoma Create users to dive into. Being told to “create anything” may seem liberating, but in reality, many people find it incredibly tough, and they often get stuck. “But when we show them a sample project, they often come back with a response like 'I would do it this way.'”

The team's goal is “to create superstars out of those who are getting Kinoma Create,” Hoddie said. “If they need certain sensors, for example, we'd pre-build it for them.”

The Kinoma Create module (left) comes with a host of sensorsready to get connected.

The Kinoma Create module (left) comes with a host of sensors
ready to get connected.

There is no proven model in the semiconductor industry for pulling off a project like this (selling a construction kit to individuals and turning the results into real commercial products), but the process might be similar to building a software developer community.

“That's something I learned when we developed QuickTime at Apple,” Hoddie said. “We worked with a small group of designers very closely. Together, we validated technology and developed business opportunities.”

— Junko Yoshida, Chief International Correspondent, EE Times Circle me on Google+

This article was originally published on EBN's sister publication EE Times .

10 comments on “Internet, Apps & Now Hardware

  1. SP
    April 9, 2014

    Hardware designig is fun. One can say its the best time for hardware development as the community and forum are getting more open, they have also talking about open source hardware development.

  2. Hailey Lynne McKeefry
    April 9, 2014

    I'm wondering if we've hit the limit on real innovation in hardware. It seems like many engineers are going the route of using building blocks and then adding software for the real innovation. What do you think?

  3. Daniel
    April 10, 2014

    “Beware, hardware is back in vogue. Web designers, software developers, and non-engineering professionals with no prior experience in designing a system are turning their attention to hardware, according to Peter Hoddie, Marvell's Kinoma vice president.”

    Junko, in some aspects you are right. Now a day's everything is possible by the influence of internet. Open source designs& tools are available with internet and enthusiastic peoples can make use of it.

  4. Daniel
    April 10, 2014

    “I'm wondering if we've hit the limit on real innovation in hardware. It seems like many engineers are going the route of using building blocks and then adding software for the real innovation. What do you think?”

    Hailey, real innovations has to be happen at the chip level because that's the basic building block. At hardware level only assembling are happening.

  5. t.alex
    April 11, 2014

    The Kinoma kit sounds familiar to Google Ara phone. Hardware (with builtin smart software) modules are able to interact with each other in intelligent ways. 

  6. Hailey Lynne McKeefry
    April 30, 2014

    @Jacob, maybe the real innovation is in designing for what users are going to want next…rather than with the next big technology.

  7. Daniel
    May 8, 2014

    “maybe the real innovation is in designing for what users are going to want next…rather than with the next big technology.”

    Hailey, if it's a market driven end to end product you are right. But when it comes at system integrator, they can only integrate with the available components.

  8. Hailey Lynne McKeefry
    May 29, 2014

    @Jacob, that word “available,” is an important one. It does create the boundaries of many manufacturing decisions and supply chain as well.

  9. itguyphil
    May 29, 2014

    The good thing about the word 'boundaries' is that it opens doors to new opportunities. If those concerns can be well defined, it can lead to new offerings, etc.

  10. Daniel
    June 2, 2014

    “that word “available,” is an important one. It does create the boundaries of many manufacturing decisions and supply chain as well.”

    Hailey, available points to the role of supply chain.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.