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t.alex
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Supply Network Guru
Re: Re : The Daunting Economics of Innovation
t.alex   5/21/2011 3:29:37 AM
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For most companies that make consumer products, i believe the average time to bring new products to the market can be as low as 3 to 4 months. It is a must that companies need to be on the constant outlook for partners and vendors.

Kunmi
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Re: Re : The Daunting Economics of Innovation
Kunmi   5/17/2011 1:07:59 AM
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This is true  of many companies. The level of growth of idea and upspringing innotation are far more that the financial strength of some of these companies. The best idea is to share the cost with other companies because it helps to bring the products to the market within an appreciable time.

eemom
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Re: Re : The Daunting Economics of Innovation
eemom   5/16/2011 5:29:29 PM
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jbond..I totally agree with your post.  Companies can't take on all the cost associated with innovation, they must share the costs with partners who can provide a value add.  A foundry can invest in a new state of the art fab benefiting a multitude of customers.  If each customer invested in their own processes from beginning to end, it would 1) be too costly and 2) redundant.

jbond
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Re: Re : The Daunting Economics of Innovation
jbond   5/16/2011 7:34:20 AM
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I think you are dead on with your assessment of TI. I think many companies are going to be looking at using partners for various processes. With such a great investment needed, particularly for just one segment, it makes more financial sense to use their partners to help reduce costs and overall risks.

Toms
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The Daunting Economics of Innovation
Toms   5/16/2011 3:30:21 AM
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     Now a day’s growth of technology is very faster and hence new innovations are also happening. For example, in television sector we had seen the fast transaction phases from CRT to latest 3D technology. All this transactions happened and dominated only for a short period. Here the technology is growing and inventions are also happening very rapidly. Since the transition time frames are faster, nobody is able to take advantages of these interim products. Sam thing is happening for other key technology areas too. Now it’s the time for miniaturization and all the existing products are rebuilding for handy products.

anandvy
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Supply Network Guru
Re : The Daunting Economics of Innovation
anandvy   5/14/2011 1:06:31 AM
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Joanne,

 Thanks for the post. If we look at the major cost factors, most of the spending happens in leading edge-process technology development and advanced 300mm fab. This is the reason why companies like TI are going fabless for Digital. By turning over more control of logic process development to its foundry partners, TI is offloading some of the risk and and reducing investment cost.





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