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pocharle
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Re: Mobile OS Market Growth by Recent Acquirers
pocharle   5/28/2011 9:02:49 AM
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I hope they do. I've invested alot of resources in the 'Windows' platform that I just about need them to stay on top (relatively speaking) for a while.

Dave Sasson
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Re: Mobile OS Market Growth by Recent Acquirers
Dave Sasson   5/28/2011 6:56:38 AM
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Hi pocharle, Thanks for the link.  Looks like Microsoft wins either way.  I did enjoy reading about Windows Phone Mango and all the features Microsoft is adding.  They are in it to win it and are not just sitting on the sidelines and with the Nokia deal, I see them gaining more momentum worldwide in the years to come.

pocharle
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Re: Mobile OS Market Growth by Recent Acquirers
pocharle   5/27/2011 8:45:16 PM
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stochastic excursion
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multitasking
stochastic excursion   5/24/2011 3:56:43 PM
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Up to a year ago on the Droid, apps couldn't be launched or used while a phone connection was in place.  I haven't seen whther they've taken steps to enhance the multitasking there.

seel225
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Apple: Trailblazing a New Future
seel225   5/24/2011 11:47:52 AM
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Apple is the poineer in smart phone market, it made huge impact on the mobile market until Android came in to market.Each OS has its fair share of victories.The iPhone's huge app count doesn't help it in certain situations. After all, Apple only just bestowed multitasking to its development community, something programmers have been working with on Android for a couple of years. Also, iPhones don't run widgets — an extension of an app that appears on an Android phone's home screen. When it comes to music and social networking, widgets mean a huge advantage.

But Android suffers in other ways. Because the OS is freely available to anyone who builds hardware, carriers sell Android phones with a variety of screen sizes and processor speeds. This makes game designers in particular kinda twitchy, especially since they know that a new iPhone will only come out once a year, setting a new top-bar standard when it does.



Parser
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Re: Apple: Trailblazing a New Future
Parser   5/23/2011 11:37:57 AM
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@Morry,

There are good sides to each: standard system and non-standard. A closed well controlled environment like the from Apple offers very little to none of the viruses and other mishaps. As long as Apple will be innovative and comprehensive in its solutions they might be not the first but they will be the elite. 

On the market there is still room for a few more competitors. All that might be different from gaming market. Maybe population is maturing and they don't play games that much any more. 

Having a Mac computer one can find out that all developer software is included with the operating system (It may not be installed, but it is available.) Writing programs on Mac for any Apple platform is one click away and the computer does not have to be connected to the internet. 

 

Michell Prunty
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Blogger
Re: Apple: Trailblazing a New Future
Michell Prunty   5/23/2011 1:57:33 AM
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Cross posted on Morry's blog: Apple Repeating Mistakes. 

I'm interested to see if you all have an opinion: 

 

I’d like to compare this to another market: The PC / console market.  

A few years ago developers left the PC gaming market en masse for the console market.  Why?  Because it is easier to develop for one set of hardware – i.e., the Xbox, PS, or Nintendo.  These are closed sourced systems yet if you go to your local gaming shop, you’ll find a smaller and smaller market place for PC games every year.  Its harder to develop for the PC market because every configuration is different, leading to bloat – a cause for long development times and higher costs.  

“The iOS is by far the most profitable platform”  -  Like the console market, the iOS is a single hardware system, which is identical to the PS, Xbox, Nintendo systems.  The Android is like the PC system.  

For the gaming market at least, it seems developers prefer a closed system.  Does that translate to the smart phone market?  

A possible turning point for Android?  A single, hugely popular piece of software that only runs on the Android.  Like World of Warcraft did for the PC – 12million players strong and now one of the only reasons PC gaming still survives.  

“Eventually, cell phone manufacturers will coalesce around a standard” – that’s the main problem, until there is a standard then Android will be second tier compared to Apple.  And what is the likelihood that multiple hardware providers will be willing to standardize?  

One of the main differences between now and then, is the proliferation of the internet – want to find out how to develop for Apple?  It’s a Google click away.  :)


mario8a
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Re: Apple: Trailblazing a New Future
mario8a   5/23/2011 1:55:50 AM
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Hi Michell

Dave presented some grhapics about the market share, but he said it was not the glogal or the total marjet share... I was just corious to see thar ghrapic.

I agree with you about iphone overtaken Mokia.

:D

thanks ....

 

Michell Prunty
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Blogger
Re: Apple: Trailblazing a New Future
Michell Prunty   5/23/2011 1:35:14 AM
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@mario8a

Apple is now the #1 smart phone supplier, having recently overtaken Nokia, so the iPhone is still gaining in market share.  However for the OS - Android is gaining in overall market share because they have multiple suppliers:  Samsung, Sony, Motorola, HTC, etc.

@mfbertozzi

I don’t think you’re wrong.  Cloud computing is basically going back to the distributed computing method that we’ve abandoned in the past.  Only this time with wifi.  Cloud is great for corporations, collaboration, offsite storage, but consumers are going to want to store their files on their own system and have control over what software they run.  No one wants to worry about whether Flickr may one day lose all their photos because they didn’t have an onsite storage system as well.  

@pocharle

I have an Android HTC EVO, and probably would go Android again, just because my SO does Android development, but if that wasn’t a concern I would go with the iPhone.  I also have an iPad, which I love mostly because of the lack of lag.

Michell Prunty
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Blogger
Re: Not quite correct
Michell Prunty   5/23/2011 1:24:36 AM
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@hardcore

 

 

I’m not sure we’re actually in disagreement about anything, though I see now rereading my article where you would find fault with it:  

“Android is the exact opposite; its OS becomes bloated in order to run on a variety of different hardware configurations.”  

Android is compiled by each manufacturer for their phone – I agree with you and misspoke.  I meant to refer to the apps.  The differing screen sizes, graphics, keyboard, touchscreen, processors all are a cause for bloat / lag and the reason why there is no lag for apps on the iPhone.

There is room for discussion on this topic though:

Android has lag issues – iOS does not.  
Android has to support a variety of hardware configurations – iOS does not.  
Lag/Bloat is either in the apps interacting with the OS, the OS itself, or the hardware.  The iOS has had a longer time to grow and cut out flaws, the Android is relatively new.  Is there lag in the Android OS?  I don’t know.

Is there lag in the app software?  Yes.  
There are several different APIs for the Android – each attributed to different hardware sets.  To develop, you have to make your software support some set of standards, which the user’s phone may or may not run.  This is the problem of the open source market place.  

And I agree, the market share of Apple’s OS is going to go down.  But I wouldn’t call that a failure or a repeat of past mistakes – its just the nature of the market.  But in terms of hardware – Apple is the #1 supplier of smart phones and that’s not going to go away anytime soon.

 

 

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