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Tvotapka
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Stock Keeper
Re: Innovation comes in an Apple shape
Tvotapka   5/27/2011 11:07:58 AM
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Totally!! Yes. In fact we apply a series of condition formulas to the businesses we work with (works for individuals too btw). And when you have a brand new idea, project or effort underway, and surveying is a vital step. In fact the entire formula goes like this:

1. Find a communication line

2. Make yourself known.

3. Discover what is needed or wanted.

4. Do, produce and/or present it.

It's simple, but you'd be amazed at how many bypass this step.

Susan Fourtané
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Re: Innovation comes in an Apple shape
Susan Fourtané   5/27/2011 10:43:23 AM
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Tvotapka, 

And isn't that all what market research is about? They first find out what the customers would like to change/add/have in a product, they manufacture and deliver. Apple seems to do this very well. 

-Susan

Tvotapka
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Stock Keeper
Re: Innovation comes in an Apple shape
Tvotapka   5/26/2011 10:38:49 AM
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I'd tend to think you're right, though I'm not on the inside there. Going by what I see, I can't deny that every generation or version of an Apple device seems to answer specific issues customers verbalize one way or another.

Susan Fourtané
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Re: Innovation comes in an Apple shape
Susan Fourtané   5/26/2011 2:03:19 AM
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Tvotapka, 

More than prediction I would say Apple has a very good market research team. 

-Susan

mario8a
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Apple: Repeating the Mistakes of the Past
mario8a   5/25/2011 8:50:55 PM
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Hi

From my point of view, times change, people change, Apple has 20 years more of maturity, so Steve Jobs, I highly doubt they will make same mistakes.

 

Regards

Tvotapka
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Stock Keeper
Re: Innovation comes in an Apple shape
Tvotapka   5/25/2011 3:26:36 PM
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I agree. Apple's ability to invent markets is uncanny. In most cases, a product development team would determine what's needed or wanted before it got too far into a product's life cycle. Apple tends to predict what its audience will want, build the product and then create the demand.

elctrnx_lyf
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Supply Network Guru
Android in mobiles will be like windows in pc
elctrnx_lyf   5/23/2011 2:56:47 PM
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Android will certainly grow into much bigger and bigger markets. As Android phones become more popular the OS will become a standardized like Windows OS in PC market. So probably Apple has to innovate some thing better by then, they belive in lower customers, higher prices and higher margins.

sdb999
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Stock Keeper
Apple doing the right thing
sdb999   5/23/2011 12:46:29 PM
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One thing no one is talking about is the stability of iOS vs Android.  With Apple keeping the OS proprietary, they are ensuring the stability of the product.  That is a BIG plus with consumers these days.  Consumers don't want their products to crash.  I own an Android phone and an Ipod Touch.  My phone needs restarted twice a day because it is locked up.  My Ipod never has any problems.

The other thing to consider with Apple is the applications available are virus free.  Wait for the first virus on Android because it is open source and see what happens to Android markt share.

Susan Fourtané
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Innovation comes in an Apple shape
Susan Fourtané   5/23/2011 7:14:14 AM
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Morry, 

Good post. 

As history shows Apple is the one always coming up with the innovation and the rest just copy. For this I would say that yes, we can expect the next big thing coming from the Apple's oven, too. 

-Susan 

Michell Prunty
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Blogger
Consoles vs smart phones?
Michell Prunty   5/23/2011 1:55:52 AM
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Morry,

I’d like to compare this to another market: The PC / console market.  

A few years ago developers left the PC gaming market en masse for the console market.  Why?  Because it is easier to develop for one set of hardware – i.e., the Xbox, PS, or Nintendo.  These are closed sourced systems yet if you go to your local gaming shop, you’ll find a smaller and smaller market place for PC games every year.  Its harder to develop for the PC market because every configuration is different, leading to bloat – a cause for long development times and higher costs.  

“The iOS is by far the most profitable platform”  -  Like the console market, the iOS is a single hardware system, which is identical to the PS, Xbox, Nintendo systems.  The Android is like the PC system.  

For the gaming market at least, it seems developers prefer a closed system.  Does that translate to the smart phone market?  

A possible turning point for Android?  A single, hugely popular piece of software that only runs on the Android.  Like World of Warcraft did for the PC – 12million players strong and now one of the only reasons PC gaming still survives.  

“Eventually, cell phone manufacturers will coalesce around a standard” – that’s the main problem, until there is a standard then Android will be second tier compared to Apple.  And what is the likelihood that multiple hardware providers will be willing to standardize?  

One of the main differences between now and then, is the proliferation of the internet – want to find out how to develop for Apple?  It’s a Google click away.  :)

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