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Slideshow: Top 10 Graduate Supply Chain Programs

For students who want to go beyond a basic college education in supply chain to do graduate-level, there's a lot of good news. Gartner, in its recent US Supply Chain Graduate Programs report, identified the leading programs in the space.

The report, which is in its third year, looked at 35 US universities to find the cream of the crop. “In the university community, competition between programs is intense, but friendly,” said Dana Stiffler, research vice president at Gartner in a press release. “With so much growth in programs, and industry sponsors lining up to invest in universities' supply chain centers, the sense is that supply chain has finally 'arrived' as a profession.”

With a few exceptions, universities that support undergraduates for supply chain training tend to excel in more advanced education, with Penn State, Michigan State, University of Tennessee, and University of Texas at Austin appearing in the top 10 for both undergrad and graduate offerings. Click on the picture below to start the slideshow.

1. Penn State University

Offering both a Master's of professional studies (two years) and a graduate certificate (one year) in supply chain management, the Penn State Smeal College of Business captured the top spot in the ranking. The Master's program offers an online curriculum that allows students an anytime, anywhere experience, and the school says that it offers a 'curriculum grounded in proven theory, best business practices, and emerging innovation' that 'enables students to examine supply chain processes, manage information technology enabled logistics, and craft supply chain strategies.'
Meanwhile, the certificate program is 'focused on building competence across the foundations of supply chain management,' the University said.

Offering both a Master's of professional studies (two years) and a graduate certificate (one year) in supply chain management, the Penn State Smeal College of Business captured the top spot in the ranking. The Master's program offers an online curriculum that allows students an anytime, anywhere experience, and the school says that it offers a “curriculum grounded in proven theory, best business practices, and emerging innovation” that “enables students to examine supply chain processes, manage information technology enabled logistics, and craft supply chain strategies.”

Meanwhile, the certificate program is “focused on building competence across the foundations of supply chain management,” the University said.

— Hailey Lynne McKeefry, Editor in Chief, EBN Circle me on Google+ Follow me on Twitter Visit my LinkedIn page Friend me on Facebook

13 comments on “Slideshow: Top 10 Graduate Supply Chain Programs

  1. Daniel
    October 17, 2014

    “The report, which is in its third year, looked at 35 US universities to find the cream of the crop. “In the university community, competition between programs is intense, but friendly,” said Dana Stiffler, research vice president at Gartner in a press release. “With so much growth in programs, and industry sponsors lining up to invest in universities' supply chain centers, the sense is that supply chain has finally 'arrived' as a profession.””

    Hailey, it seems that supply chain domain is growing to the main stream like IT and hardware. Whether these universities offering any supply chain main stream courses (UG/PG) or only as an additional certificate course, along with other main courses?

  2. FLYINGSCOT
    October 18, 2014

    I was chatting with a chap at a conference and he was speaking very highly of the graduates in supply chain from Penn State and Texas A&M.  It appears as if these folks are leaving university with real transferrable skills.

  3. Hailey Lynne McKeefry
    October 20, 2014

    @Jacob, there are some certificate programs. Many offer online courses and are aimed at providing real-world information and learning to people while they remain in their jobs. My research has shown me that there is a real breadth of offerings so that there's something for just about everyone if you look for it.

  4. Hailey Lynne McKeefry
    October 20, 2014

    I'd be interested to know whether electronics companies are supporting continuing ed for their supply chain folks. What's  your experience, EBN readers? Does your company offer incentives or support for those who want to go back to school?

  5. Daniel
    October 21, 2014

    “there are some certificate programs. Many offer online courses and are aimed at providing real-world information and learning to people while they remain in their jobs. My research has shown me that there is a real breadth of offerings so that there's something for just about everyone if you look for it.”

    Hailey, thanks for the clarification. It means that still none of the colleges or universities are not offering a supply chain course in main stream; I mean a full time regular 3/4 year course.

  6. Hailey Lynne McKeefry
    October 21, 2014

    In the US, there are three types of programs that are beyond a traditional four year bachelor degree. The Masters (which is usually a two to three year course), a doctorate (which is more study plus a thesis paper of some sort) and certificates which are aimed at particular skills. All of these are on the list in the slideshow. Each program has different requirements and credits.

  7. Hailey Lynne McKeefry
    October 21, 2014

    EBNers: where did you go to school? Show some school pride and let us know where you graduated from and what you loved about our school!

  8. Daniel
    October 22, 2014

    “I'd be interested to know whether electronics companies are supporting continuing ed for their supply chain folks. What's  your experience, EBN readers? Does your company offer incentives or support for those who want to go back to school?”

    Hailey, it seems that most of such companies are supporting employees for continuing education. But may not be in core supply chain subjects, they need their employees to train more on management side.

  9. Daniel
    October 22, 2014

    “EBNers: where did you go to school? Show some school pride and let us know where you graduated from and what you loved about our school!”

    Hailey, it's an evergreen story in everyone's memory.

  10. Hailey Lynne McKeefry
    October 22, 2014

    @Jacob, that's too bad. There are a lot of people that think they can  manage–and there a lot of supply chain skills that can really help boost an organizations efficiency and provide cost savings.

  11. Daniel
    October 24, 2014

    “that's too bad. There are a lot of people that think they can  manage–and there a lot of supply chain skills that can really help boost an organizations efficiency and provide cost savings.”

    Hailey, as a supply chain professional we feel like that; but from corporate management perspective they need to top justify such sponsorship.

  12. BlairHogg
    January 13, 2015

    Saw this article from a link in an recent e-mail from EBN. What I found interesting is that aside form MIT, every other school on the list appears to be a state sponsored school. I wasn't sure about MIT if they are private or state sponsored.

    I completed an MBA with the majority of my courses in SCM a few years back at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania. I though it was a good program and got a lot out of it. I missed the SCM conecntration as I couldn't fit the marketing course in to my schedule, taking classes a combination of nights, on-line and on-demand. I wonder what criteria was used to judge the schools.

    Blair

  13. Hailey Lynne McKeefry
    January 13, 2015

    @BlairHogg, you make an excellent point–MIT is private, but there's a real compliment of public schools. I think this bodes well for the industry because it means that getting a supply chain degree will be affordable enough that people might do it, and OEMs might even help pay for it.

    Thanks for the vote for Lehigh. I think that the combination of easy scheduling with night classes and online classes are going to be a must have for many of these programs. Have you thought about going back to take a class or two as continuing education? Does your company support or encourage that?

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