Advertisement

Blog

The HP Garage: An Armchair Travelers Guide to Where the Innovation Began

HP is arguably household name with its portfolio of printers, PCs, mobile devices, services and more.  Today, the veteran electronics OEM is a $48 billion-dollar company, but in 1938, it was only a dream shared by two guys working in a garage in Palo Alto, CA.

I made my way to 367 Addison Ave. for an exclusive tour of where HP’s rich history all began.  The garage where it started, as well as a toolshed and a house in a quaint little neighborhood in Palo Alto is still there. HP bought and restored the property to preserve its history. The house isn’t open to the public, but the garage was named a California Historical Landmark on May 19, 1989. Dubbed “the birthplace of Silicon Valley,” it captures a critical moment in the history of technology when these two visionaries started their now legendary partnership.

The house was built in 1905 and was a rental property for most of its history. In 1938, David and Lucile Packard married and rented the lower level of the house (their landlady lived upstairs).  David’s good friend and collaborator Bill Hewlett moved into the little shack behind the house, saying that he was happy to live simply if it let him stay near his work.

Hewlett-Packard bought the house in 2000, and set to work turning the clock back by restoring the house to its original condition (while still complying with modern building codes). The company completed the project and celebrated with a ribbon cutting ceremony on December 6, 2005.

Click on the image below to take a virtual tour of the house, toolshed and garage where HP and its legacy began.

HP Garage: The Birthplace of Silicon Valley

— Hailey Lynne McKeefry, Editor in Chief, EBN Circle me on Google+ Follow me on Twitter Visit my LinkedIn page Friend me on Facebook

7 comments on “The HP Garage: An Armchair Travelers Guide to Where the Innovation Began

  1. Steve.Leibson
    September 1, 2017

    “Oscilloscope” should read “oscillator” in Figure 7. H&P didn't build scopes until long after the company moved from the garage.

  2. stn564
    September 1, 2017

    And also in Figure 7, “entrepreneur's” is a plural and does not need the apostrophe.

  3. Finder
    September 7, 2017

    Well, it can be used both ways. In this awesome post, you really only caught the mistake(s).

  4. Eduardo.Master
    September 7, 2017

    Click on the image below to take a virtual tour of the house, toolshed and garage where HP and its legacy began.

  5. stn564
    September 10, 2017

    @Finder…don't get me wrong, it's a great article and a good read, and a bigger fan of Bill & Dave you couldn't find.  But a journalist should know what to do (or not do) with an apostrophe, and a technical journalist should know the subject well enough not to confuse terms like that.

  6. andilala
    September 12, 2017

    I have to thank you for the efforts you have put in writing this site. I really hope to view the same high-grade content by you later on as well. In fact, your creative writing abilities has encouraged me to get my own, personal website now http://www.zuzzintuscany.com

     

  7. iarbaverde
    September 15, 2017

    innovation in China maybe, your article is good tho

Leave a Reply